National & World News from NPR

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Earlier in November, we asked our readers and listeners to share what about America they are most thankful for.

More than a thousand people from across the country responded, including many teachers who turned the question into a class assignment — shout-out to Ms. Goerke's 8th grade English class in Louisville, Ky.

Turns out, many of you are grateful for libraries, which Jody Ondich of Duluth, Minn., described as "sacred places to share knowledge and creativity."

Russian President Vladimir Putin was fielding questions from a hall of sedate academics last month when suddenly, Oleg Sirota's riotous head of curly brown hair popped out of the crowd of dark suits.

"I'm a farmer and cheesemaker from the Moscow region," Sirota declared on national TV. "I wanted to thank you for the sanctions."

In 2011, police in central Moldova responded to a call reporting a dead body.

They found a passport, hotel cards and contact phone numbers belonging to a Minnesota man named Igor Vorotinov.

Vorotinov's ex-wife, Irina, was notified and traveled to the small Eastern European nation to identify the body. She returned to the U.S. with a death certificate and an urn of ashes.

Investigators who are trying to track down the source of E. coli contamination in romaine lettuce are feeling that they've seen this movie before.

Over the past six weeks, at least 50 people in the U.S. and Canada have gone to the doctor suffering from the symptoms of food poisoning. They were infected with an identical strain of E. coli bacteria. Most of them remembered eating romaine lettuce.

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This year, Michael B. Jordan has clearly brought his A game. He stole the show in "Black Panther" with his charismatic turn as Erik Killmonger, the villain in a superhero movie.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "BLACK PANTHER")

Editor's note: This story was originally published on November 14 and has been updated to reflect a new commentary on Yemen published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Three weeks ago, 10-year-old Sara was sitting up in her bed at a hospital in Hodeidah, Yemen. A small hole sliced into her throat was helping her breathe.

She was recovering from a rare bacterial infection, called diphtheria. The bacteria had paralyzed part of her body. And there was only one reason why Sara was so sick: Yemen's civil war.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This year, Michael B. Jordan has clearly brought his A game. He stole the show in "Black Panther" with his charismatic turn as Erik Killmonger, the villain in a superhero movie.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "BLACK PANTHER")

Copyright 2018 Maine Public. To see more, visit Maine Public.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This year, Michael B. Jordan has clearly brought his A game. He stole the show in "Black Panther" with his charismatic turn as Erik Killmonger, the villain in a superhero movie.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This year, Michael B. Jordan has clearly brought his A game. He stole the show in "Black Panther" with his charismatic turn as Erik Killmonger, the villain in a superhero movie.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "BLACK PANTHER")

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This year, Michael B. Jordan has clearly brought his A game. He stole the show in "Black Panther" with his charismatic turn as Erik Killmonger, the villain in a superhero movie.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "BLACK PANTHER")

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This year, Michael B. Jordan has clearly brought his A game. He stole the show in "Black Panther" with his charismatic turn as Erik Killmonger, the villain in a superhero movie.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "BLACK PANTHER")

Daniel B. Shapiro (@DanielBShapiro), a distinguished visiting fellow at Israel's Institute for National Security Studies, served as U.S. ambassador to Israel from 2011 to 2017 and senior director for the Middle East and North Africa at the National Security Council during the Obama administration.

Driving though the segregated South in 1962, an Italian-American bouncer from the Bronx introduces the pleasures of fried chicken to an African-American pianist originally from Pensacola, Fla. Anyone who finds that moment plausible is tuned to the same wavelength as Green Book, a well-meaning but glib and shallow ode to interracial healing.

In 1985's Rocky IV, the most most high-and-tight entry in the formerly-shaggy Rockiad, an age-obsessed Apollo Creed (Carl Weathers) laments to his opponent-turned-pal Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) that "we're turning into regular people." Apollo's obsession with proving he can still compete after half a decade in retirement leads him to pursue an exhibition match with genetically engineered Soviet supercomrade Ivan Drago (Dolph Lundgren), who beats Apollo to death.

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Doctors across the U.S. have become increasingly vocal in addressing gun violence as a public health crisis, a posture that recently has drawn the wrath of the National Rifle Association.

Yet, in Colorado, a diverse group that includes doctors, public health researchers and gun shop owners has come together to bridge this divide. The Colorado Firearm Safety Coalition has found common ground on at least one issue: preventing firearm suicide.

An 18-year-old in Hemer, Germany, managed to earn and lose his drivers' license over the course of less than an hour.

He successfully obtained his license on Tuesday and celebrated — how else? — by going for a drive. At nearly twice the legal speed limit.

Just 49 minutes after he earned his license, a police laser speed gun clocked him going 95 km/hr in a 50 km/hr zone — that is, nearly 60 mph in a 32 mph area.

Just like that, his brand-new license was no more.

Every year since 1986, the American Farm Bureau Federation has released an informal report on changes in the cost of Thanksgiving Dinner. We talk with the Farm Bureau's Chief Economist, John Newton, about the survey to see what's changed over the last year.

Music by Drop Electric. Find us: Twitter/ Facebook.

One of the companies that handles federal student loans has been steering some borrowers toward repayment plans that cost them more money over time.

That's the finding of a report that the Department of Education's Office of Federal Student Aid did on Navient, one of its loan servicers. But while FSA offered suggestions for improving some of Navient's practices, it says the company didn't necessarily do anything wrong.

A 31-year-old British man accused of spying for the U.K. government while on an apparent academic research trip in the United Arab Emirates was handed a life sentence Wednesday.

Matthew Hedges, a doctoral candidate at England's Durham University, was detained at Dubai International Airport on May 5 after a two-week research trip for his thesis on Emirati security and foreign policy, his wife, Daniela Tejada, told Human Rights Watch.

Updated at 5:55 p.m. ET

In a rare moment of direct criticism, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts rebuked President Trump on Wednesday for the president's description of a federal judge who ruled against his asylum policy as "an Obama judge." Within hours, the president fired back on Twitter, launching an unusual conflict between the executive and judicial branches.

Updated at 1:33 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Michigan has dropped most of the charges against a Detroit doctor accused of female genital mutilation, concluding that Congress "overstepped its bounds" when it passed a law banning the practice.

That 1996 law violates the Constitution and is unenforceable, the judge concluded, because in general, criminal law is left to the states — and female genital mutilation should be no exception.

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