Don Gonyea

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We're going to bring in another voice now, NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea, who is following the special election in Georgia and just heard that conversation with Jon Ossoff. Hey, Don.

DON GONYEA, BYLINE: Good morning.

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In Virginia, tomorrow is a primary election day. The governorship is the biggest office up for grabs. And the contest on the Democratic side is also seen as a referendum on the direction of the Democratic Party itself. Here's NPR's Don Gonyea.

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The special election in Montana for the state's only seat in the U.S. House of Representatives took a remarkable turn last night.

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GREG GIANFORTE: Speak with Shane, please.

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Talk to voters across the country about President Trump's first 100 days in office and a few things become abundantly clear:

His supporters — those who turned out in force and voted for him — still overwhelmingly love him.

His detractors — and they are many, given that Trump failed to win the popular vote — are still shocked by his election and appalled by his behavior.

He has lost support, particularly among moderates and independent voters. That's a big reason that polls give him the lowest approval rating of any modern president this soon after taking office.

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Much of President Trump's political strength comes from the fact that he won in places Republicans usually don't.

In November, long-time Democratic states like Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin flipped from blue to red. He nearly did it here in Minnesota, too, a place that hasn't gone Republican since 1972.

George DeTitta, a retired biomedical researcher, is no fan of President Trump's.

"Well, the day he got inaugurated, I put on my Facebook page, 'Not my president,' " the 69-year-old Democrat says, sitting at a table near the window at a restaurant in downtown Buffalo.

DeTitta says he took the post down the next day, but he's been watching the Trump White House with alarm ever since. Even something Democrats felt relief about — the failure of the president and fractured House Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act — wasn't reason for DeTitta to celebrate.

Thursday will mark seven years since President Obama signed the now-threatened Affordable Care Act before a crowd in the jam-packed East Room of the White House. It was the signature legislative moment of his presidency, underscored by then-Vice President Biden, who whispered into the president's ear that it was a "big f****** deal." The mic picked up the remark, which created quite a stir.

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Outside of show business, the presidency is one of the few jobs that comes with its own song.

In a tradition dating back to the 1800s, when the commander in chief enters the room, the U.S. Marine Band strikes up "Hail to the Chief."

It started out a simple, human interest story featuring a former president and his post-White House hobby — painting watercolors of world leaders, and now, portraits of American soldiers, wounded during military service.

President Trump's status with the Conservative Political Action Conference has gone from "it's complicated" to a full-on committed relationship.

That turnaround was to be expected, given that the former reality TV star and billionaire businessman pulled off an unlikely upset last November that finally gave attendees at CPAC what they had been salivating over for more than a decade — control of the White House, Congress and a new conservative justice nominated to the Supreme Court.

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One of the most fragile pieces of President Obama's legacy in the aftermath of the 2016 election is the Affordable Care Act.

Republicans ran on their long-standing pledge to repeal it, and we'll know soon whether — as promised — they make it their top priority in the new Congress, even without having released details on what would replace it.

The history of the Affordable Care Act also provides a window into the earliest years of the Obama presidency.

Here are some of the ways Donald Trump has described himself during the 2016 presidential campaign:

"Very conservative."

"A common-sense conservative."

"A conservative with a heart."

But talk to conservative activists, and it's not unusual to still hear things like this:

"Well, I remain a skeptic," says activist and GOP campaign veteran Rick Tyler, who adds, "I don't know that Donald Trump is a conservative."

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The contest to see who will be the next leader of the Democratic National Committee has just gotten much more interesting — it's also looking a bit like a proxy battle between President Obama and Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Updated at 9:10 a.m. ET

For more than 50 years, it's been a tradition at the White House — a concise daily intelligence briefing, presented to the president and a small group of top officials.

It is also tradition for the winner of the presidential election to start receiving the same briefing during his transition, as a way to start preparing for the world he will face once he moves into the Oval Office.

But Donald Trump, who defied all conventions of campaigning for the White House, is doing the same when it comes to the President's Daily Brief.

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In what may be the most unlikely meeting of the presidential transition process so far, former vice president, former Democratic presidential nominee, former senator and Nobel Peace Prize winner Al Gore met with President-elect Donald Trump on Monday.

Gore has spent decades warning about the dire consequences of unchecked, man-made climate change, while Trump has regularly called climate change "a hoax" during the campaign.

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President-elect Trump held a campaign-style rally in Cincinnati last night.

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DONALD TRUMP: Thank you.

(CHEERING)

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