Rachel Martin

Rachel Martin is host of Morning Edition, as well as NPR's morning news podcast Up First, along with Steve Inskeep and David Greene.

Before taking on this role in December 2016, Martin was the host of Weekend Edition Sunday for four years. Martin also served as National Security Correspondent for NPR, where she covered both defense and intelligence issues. She traveled regularly to Iraq and Afghanistan with the Secretary of Defense, reporting on the U.S. wars and the effectiveness of the Pentagon's counterinsurgency strategy. Martin also reported extensively on the changing demographic of the U.S. military – from the debate over whether to allow women to fight in combat units – to the repeal of Don't Ask Don't Tell. Her reporting on how the military is changing also took her to a U.S. Air Force base in New Mexico for a rare look at how the military trains drone pilots.

Martin was part of the team that launched NPR's experimental morning news show, The Bryant Park Project, based in New York — a two-hour daily multimedia program that she co-hosted with Alison Stewart and Mike Pesca.

In 2006-2007, Martin served as NPR's religion correspondent. Her piece on Islam in America was awarded "Best Radio Feature" by the Religion News Writers Association in 2007. As one of NPR's reporters assigned to cover the Virginia Tech massacre that same year, she was on the school's campus within hours of the shooting and on the ground in Blacksburg, Va., covering the investigation and emotional aftermath in the following days.

Based in Berlin, Germany, Martin worked as a NPR foreign correspondent from 2005-2006. During her time in Europe, she covered the London terrorist attacks, the federal elections in Germany, the 2006 World Cup and issues surrounding immigration and shifting cultural identities in Europe.

Her foreign reporting experience extends beyond Europe. Martin has also worked extensively in Afghanistan. She began reporting from there as a freelancer during the summer of 2003, covering the reconstruction effort in the wake of the U.S. invasion. In fall 2004, Martin returned for several months to cover Afghanistan's first democratic presidential election. She has reported widely on women's issues in Afghanistan, the fledgling political and governance system and the U.S.-NATO fight against the insurgency. She has also reported from Iraq, where she covered U.S. military operations and the strategic alliance between Sunni sheiks and the U.S. military in Anbar province.

Martin started her career at public radio station KQED in San Francisco, as a producer and reporter.

She holds an undergraduate degree in political science from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Washington, and a Master's degree in International Affairs from Columbia University.

The history of jazz in the 20th century is well known, but the course of the genre in the 21st century is still being charted. According to Nate Chinen, music critic for NPR Music and WBGO, jazz in the new millennium has enjoyed a type of Renaissance thanks to some key players.

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All right. So President Trump's legal team has sent this letter to special counsel Robert Mueller, and there is an offer there about a presidential interview as part of the Russia investigation.

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Morning News Brief

Aug 3, 2018

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White House officials came out yesterday, and they showed a rare unified front. They said they're focused on preventing interference in U.S. elections.

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Yeah. Here's how Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats put it.

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Fallout from the election in Zimbabwe this week appears to be getting violent. Security forces in the capital city Harare have been confronting protesters. NPR's Eyder Peralta was there when the unrest broke out.

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Morning News Brief

Jul 30, 2018

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All right, President Trump is once again threatening to shut down the government if he doesn't get money for his border wall.

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Morning News Brief

Jul 24, 2018

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President Trump is considering revoking the security clearances of some former high-level officials who have criticized him.

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Morning News Brief

Jul 10, 2018

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President Trump has made his choice to fill a second seat on the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Yeah. He did it in a prime-time TV address last night delivered from the White House. President Trump announced his pick, federal judge Brett Kavanaugh.

Morning News Brief

Jun 28, 2018

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The upcoming midterm elections were always going to be intense, right? And now just to make things even more interesting, you throw in a battle over a Supreme Court nominee.

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Morning News Brief

Jun 18, 2018

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We begin about 40 miles outside El Paso, Texas, where the federal government is holding around 100 detained migrant boys in a desert tent encampment.

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Moviegoers sitting down to see Incredibles 2 are in for a tasty treat in the form of an animated short called Bao. It tells the story of an empty nester who discovers joy — and sorrow — when a steamed bun she makes comes to life.

The story is pulled from the childhood of Domee Shi, who wrote and directed the Pixar film. Shi was born in China and raised in Toronto. She started working at Pixar as an intern in 2011, and now she's the first woman to direct a Pixar short.

Morning News Brief

Jun 7, 2018

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In recent years, North Korea has launched missiles that theoretically could have reached the United States.

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Paul Manafort has been at home waiting for his trial to start, and soon, he may have to wait in jail.

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Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and other top Democrats sent a letter to President Trump yesterday, laying out five tough demands ahead of Trump's summit with North Korea later this month, including "verifiable and irreversible dismantlement of North Korea's nuclear program." Schumer spoke with NPR's Rachel Martin on Monday afternoon in his office at the Capitol.

Rachel Martin: Thank you so much for taking the time to talk with us.

Sen. Chuck Schumer: Great to be here.

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How much does President Trump's power protect him from the special counsel?

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Morning News Brief

Jun 1, 2018

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So much talk about the talks, you'd think the U.S.-North Korea summit was already underway.

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A group of U.S. officials crossed into North Korea yesterday.

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Even though President Trump has called off the summit, North Korea says it's still willing to meet President Trump, quote, "at any time."

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Morning News Brief

May 24, 2018

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So is this all about transparency, or are President Trump and his allies in Congress trying to back up the narrative of a witch hunt?

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What if Bucky Dent's long fly ball in the 1978 American League East playoff game hadn't cleared the Green Monster at Fenway Park? What if John Paxson had missed the 3-pointer at the end of game 6 in the 1993 NBA Finals? What if Carli Lloyd had been injured in the final of the 2015 Women's World Cup?

Sports fans are particularly good at asking what if questions. Sports, after all, are full of counterfactual possibilities replete with drama.

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History is happening in Israel today as the U.S. moves its embassy from Tel Aviv to the contested city of Jerusalem.

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Yeah. Let's remember, President Trump announced this move back in December.

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The photos of this moment were pretty amazing. The three American men who had been detained in North Korea are now free men, and these photos captured them arriving at Andrews Air Force Base in the dark hours early this morning.

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One of the leading champions of the movement to prosecute sexual abusers, the Me Too movement, is facing his own reckoning.

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An unlikely literary hero is getting his turn in the spotlight. He's a little square, but full of personality --and he sprang from the imaginations of writer Mac Barnett and writer-illustrator Jon Klassen.

Barnett and Klassen are the award-winning, best-selling creators of a bunch of picture books, including Extra Yarn and Sam and Dave Dig a Hole.

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President Trump's choice to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs faces another day of allegations about his conduct in his current job.

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In a rare joint statement, the U.S and U.K. last week warned that Russia is actively preparing for a future cyberwar against the West.

Ronan Farrow just won the Pulitzer Prize for stories he wrote for The New Yorker, but before uncovering sexual assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein for the magazine, he worked at the State Department as a special adviser in the Obama administration.

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