Sarah McCammon

Sarah McCammon worked for Iowa Public Radio as Morning Edition Host from January 2010 until December 2013.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

About a dozen top former intelligence officials are speaking out after the White House revoked the security clearance of former CIA Director John Brennan, a vocal critic of President Trump.

Also Monday, Trump told reporters that he was likely to revoke clearance for a top Justice Department official, Bruce Ohr, "very quickly."

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President Trump's daughter Ivanka Trump is again speaking out against the separation of children and parents accused of illegally crossing the U.S.-Mexico border.

At an Axios News Shapers event in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, Trump was asked for her thoughts on the separations that occurred as a result of her father's immigration policies.

The interviewer noted that some White House officials saw that as a "low point" in the Trump administration.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

The Trump administration is threatening sanctions against Turkey if the U.S. ally does not release an American pastor being held there on accusations of terror and espionage.

At a State Department event on religious freedom Thursday, Vice President Mike Pence called for Brunson's immediate release.

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Yesterday at the White House, something of a cease-fire in the U.S.-EU trade fight was announced.

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Melania Trump's Be Best campaign got off to a slow start when she fell ill just days after launching the initiative focused on the well-being of children. But this week, the first lady returned to promoting "Be Best," with a trip to Nashville to meet families affected by the opioid epidemic.

Her spokeswoman, Stephanie Grisham, said the campaign will pick up in the weeks to come.

President Trump is looking into revoking the security clearances of several former high-level officials who've criticized him.

Press secretary Sarah Sanders read a list of officials being considered for revocation of their clearances on Monday and said the White House is "exploring the mechanisms" by which the government might take them away.

It's a typical part of the White House press secretary's job: defend the president and sometimes clash with reporters. But Donald Trump is not a typical president. For Sarah Sanders, that has meant an unusually combative relationship with the press.

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So here is what President Trump says now without Russia's President Vladimir Putin standing at his side.

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At the White House yesterday, President Trump walked away - sort of - from his controversial statement in Helsinki that drew widespread condemnation. Here is what's different.

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With the balance of the Supreme Court in question, some abortion-rights advocates are quietly preparing for a future they hope never to see — one without the protections of Roe v. Wade.

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Lots of controversial cases at the intersection of religion and the law wind up before the Supreme Court.

And, for most of U.S. history, the court, like the country, was dominated by Protestant Christians. But today, it is predominantly Catholic and Jewish.

It has become more conservative and is about to get even more so with President Trump's expected pick to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is stepping down from the court at the end of July.

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Former Fox News co-President Bill Shine has been named White House deputy chief of staff for communications and assistant to the president, the White House announced Thursday.

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Updated June 29 at 12:28 p.m. ET

The process of replacing retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy is underway, and the prospect of filling the seat held by the court's swing vote is setting the stage for what is likely to be a battle over abortion rights unlike any in a generation.

Updated at 7:28 p.m. ET

First lady Melania Trump paid a second visit Thursday to children detained under her husband's "zero tolerance" policy for illegal southern border crossings.

She traveled to Tucson, Ariz., where she visited a Customs and Border Protection facility and participated in a roundtable discussion with Border Patrol, Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the U.S. Marshals Service and a local rancher. After the roundtable, the first lady toured an adjacent short-term detention facility.

In the shadow of President Trump's raucous campaign rallies this midterm election season are dozens of quieter campaign events and fundraisers headlined by Vice President Pence.

He's working to get Republicans elected this year, while quietly earning political capital that could help his own future.

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One day after reversing his administration's practice of separating immigrant families, President Trump is insisting his zero tolerance policy for illegal border crossings must remain in effect.

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Updated at 1 p.m. ET

First ladies have a long history of advocating for issues important to them, often issues related to children. But what's unusual is to have all the living former presidents' wives speaking out in one voice.

America's current and former first ladies are pushing back against the Trump administration's practice of separating children from their parents at the border in an effort to curb illegal crossings.

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