Alabama Politics

When Wallace was elected in his last term as governor, I was elected my first term in legislature. Ironically, my district included Wallace's hometown of Clayton in Barbour County...

The four Republicans running for Alabama attorney general are slugging  

their way toward an anticipated runoff. Attorney General Steve Marshall faces challenges from former U.S. Attorney Alice Martin, former Attorney General Troy King, and lawyer Chess Bedsole. The contest has become heated as the four vie for the two runoff spots.

Being a U.S. Senator was secondary in Alabama politics; governor is still probably the most important, glamorous political position today, but it certainly was [in 1962]...

Nobody will ever be governor of Alabama four or five times again. Wallace was in a class by himself when it came to politicians...

George Wallace was born to a farming family like most people in that generation, in 1919. The young Wallace was born in Barbour County, the home of Alabama governors. He was destined to be the king of Alabama politics and the most prolific governor and politician in Alabama history...

Those of us who have grown up in and around Alabama politics have coined a descriptive term for a person who is totally obsessed with seeking political office. The term I like to use to describe this person is named for the man who best exemplified this obsession - George Wallace...

Some people think it's a myth and some people think it's a legend, but those of us who've been around Alabama politics have always referred to a place knows as Bucks Pocket. For decades, losing political candidates in Alabama have been exiled to Bucks Pocket...

Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore is running for the U.S. Senate.

Moore made the announcement on the steps of the Alabama Capitol this afternoon.

Speculation has swirled that Moore might run for another office after being suspended from the bench.

Moore will run in what is expected to be a crowded GOP primary to fill the seat vacated by now U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

      State lawmakers return from spring break Tuesday to a full plate of issues. State budgets, prison construction and action on the proposed impeachment of Governor Robert Bentley are among the matters set to be decided before the session ends in late May.   

   The State House of Representatives is scheduled to vote Tuesday on whether to end Alabama's practice that allows a judge to impose a death sentence when a jury has recommended life imprisonment. Alabama is the last state to still allow a judge to override a jury's sentencing recommendation in capital murder cases. 

Small-town boys dominate in Alabama Politics and the governor's office. The only city governor of Alabama in the last 66 years is Don Siegelman, who is from Mobile...

Back in bygone days, Alabama had some legendary and colorful characters. One of the most legendary was a guy named Fuller Kimbrell from Northwest Alabama...

Lawmakers are attempting to define what criminal convictions should disqualify a person from voting.    The House of Representatives voted unanimously Thursday for the bill.  

 The Alabama Constitution says people convicted of felonies involving "moral turpitude" are no longer able to vote, although politicians have disagreed through the years on what crimes should be on that list.

Alabama's state auditor is suing Governor Robert Bentley over his appointment of Luther Strange to the U.S. Senate seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Jim Zeigler filed suit in Montgomery County on Sunday claiming Bentley is wrong in waiting until 2018 to hold an election for the position.

The Bankheads of Jasper is likely to be the most prominent political family in Alabama history...

The only political character on the Alabama political scene that paralleled George Wallace was the legendary Jim Allen...

Governor Robert Bentley is naming six finalists for the U.S. Senate seat now held by attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions.  

Bentley's list includes U.S. Representative Robert Aderholt of Haleyville and the pro tem of the State Senate, Del Marsh of Anniston.

Others include State Attorney General Luther Strange; Bentley appointee Jim Byard; state Representative Connie Rowe of Jasper; and former state legislator Perry Hooper Jr. of Montgomery.

      

           Alabama was a popular destination for those seeking the presidency this year. Republicans and Democrats made it a point to visit the Yellowhammer State to try and keep it red or turn it blue. This of course means news coverage, which in turn, brings out cartoonists. If you follow sites like Al-dot-com you’ll see the work of one man in particular…

            “Never dreamed I’d get a job drawing editorial cartoons, political, I’m not really that political by nature, I just make fun of everything.”

Impeachment committee wants Bentley to testify

Oct 26, 2016

An impeachment committee is demanding that Gov. Robert Bentley testify under oath.

The House Judiciary Committee sent a formal demand for the governor to provide deposition-like testimony to the committee's special counsel on Nov. 9.

Committee Chairman Mike Jones says the committee wants a, "clear, truthful record from the governor and his staff" and he looked forward to the governor's cooperation.

Prison Reform: Alabama's overcrowding problem

Oct 14, 2016

Alabama’s prison system has been in the news a lot this year, and not for good reasons. Inmate riots, as well as allegations of mismanagement and corruption have pointed out plenty of problems. The Alabama Public Radio news team has spent the past several months examining what happens as people go into the state’s prison system and what happens when they come out. Today, APR’s MacKenzie Bates hears from critics of Alabama’s prisons are run and how plans to fix things may just throw money at the problem…

Alabama House committee: subpoenas in impeachment probe

Sep 29, 2016

Alabama's House Judiciary Committee is issuing subpoenas to Gov. Robert Bentley and others in an ongoing impeachment investigation.

The subpoenas being delivered today come after special counsel Jack Sharman said he wasn't securing voluntarily cooperation.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley signs a compromise bill to use the state's oil spill settlement funds for debts, Medicaid and roads.

The Alabama Legislature gave final approval to the bill last night after lawmakers agreed to a compromise on how to use the money.

The plan sends $400 million to repay money borrowed during past budget shortfalls. It will also steer $120 million to the state's Medicaid program and $120 million to build roads in two coastal counties.

Alabama’s Legislature is once again scrambling to find additional funding in a special session.

Governor Robert Bentley reconvened the House and Senate in order to find new revenue for Medicaid, infrastructure, and state debt repayment. One of the most popular approaches seems to be constitutional amendment to establish a state lottery to direct revenue into Alabama’s General Fund budget. Several legislators are pushing their own versions of lottery bills, many of which include other forms of gambling as well.

A judge has scheduled a September hearing on motions filed in former House Speaker Mike Hubbard ethics case. APR’s Stan Ingold has more…

Former House Speaker Mike Hubbard is looking to overturn his criminal conviction.

Circuit Judge Jacob Walker scheduled a September second hearing on post-trial motions filed in the case. The judge did not elaborate. A jury convicted Hubbard on twelve state ethics law violations. Because of this, he was automatically removed from office after the felony conviction.

Latest on Moore hearing, Hubbard seeks new trial

Aug 9, 2016

The fate of Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore is still up in the air. APR’s Alex AuBuchon was in Montgomery for yesterday’s hearing. He files this report.

The dozens of Roy Moore supporters that packed the steps of the Alabama Judicial Building yesterday will be pleased to learn the Chief Justice hasn’t been thrown out of office -- just yet.

What's next for Mike Hubbard?

Aug 4, 2016
MacKenzie Bates/APR

The former Alabama House Speaker was convicted on more than half of the 23 felony ethics charges against him on Friday in a Lee County courtroom.  He has no job, no title, and will be sentenced next month.  APR’s MacKenzie Bates was there during the tense hours between final arguments and the verdict…

Gov. Robert Bentley's support of a referendum on a state lottery comes six years after he criticized gambling as a detriment to society.

The governor has consistently supported the people's right to vote on gambling. However, in his 2010 campaign, Bentley opposed all gambling because it preyed upon those who could least afford to lose money.

State Auditor Jim Zeigler wants to join an ongoing lawsuit in an attempt to put a stop to Governor Robert Bentley’s spending of the BP settlement money.

The state is receiving billions of dollars after reaching a settlement with BP after the 2010 Gulf oil spill.

Zeigler says the governor is acting as a “one man legislature…”

Suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore is asking a state judicial panel to dismiss ethics charges against him. Moore says he never told probate judges to refuse marriage licenses to gay couples.

Moore is accused of violating judicial ethics with a 2016 administrative order.  It came six months after the U.S. Supreme Court effectively legalized same-sex marriage.

His lawyers say the order only noted correctly that a state court injunction to refuse same-sex marriage licenses had not been lifted.

A committee of lawmakers opened impeachment hearings against Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley, beginning a probe on whether there are grounds to remove the two-term Republican from office.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Mike Jones opened the hearings Wednesday by noting the seriousness of the committee's task.

Twenty-three representatives in April signed impeachment article accusing Bentley of corruption and neglect of duty. The articles were filed after Bentley admitted making sexually-charged remarks to a top aide.

Former House Speaker Mike Hubbard's name has been removed from the Alabama Legislature's website and his legislative district is listed as vacant in the wake of his conviction on ethics charges.

A jury convicted Hubbard Friday evening on 12 felony ethics charges. The felony convictions caused Hubbard's automatic and immediate removal from office.

House Speaker Pro Tem Victor Gaston is fulfilling the speaker's duties.

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