Digital Media Center
Bryant-Denny Stadium, Gate 61
920 Paul Bryant Drive
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0370
(800) 654-4262

© 2024 Alabama Public Radio
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations
WHIL is off the air and WUAL is broadcasting on limited power. Engineers are aware and working on a solution.
Alabama Shakespeare Festival Enter for Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat
ADD MORE LOCATIONS FILE - An envelope containing a 2020 census letter mailed to a U.S. resident is seen, April 5, 2020, in Detroit. The U.S. Census Bureau on Monday, July 22, 2024, picked six locations for full-scale dress rehearsals to practice for the next U.S. head count in 2030, the largest peacetime mobilization in the U.S. which helps determine political power and the distribution of federal funds. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)
Paul Sancya/AP
/
AP
Huntsville is one of six places in the South and West will host practice runs four years prior to the 2030 U.S. census, a nationwide head count that helps determine political power and the distribution of federal funds.
News & Commentaries From APR
Now a retired English professor at The University of Alabama, Dr. Noble's specialties are Southern and American literature.
Speaking of Pets with host Mindy Norton is a commentary (opinion piece) for people who care about pets and humane treatment for animals in general, and who want to celebrate that special relationship between us and our animal companions.
Crunk Culture is a commentary (opinion piece) about creative and sometimes cursory perspectives and responses to popular culture and representations of identity. Dr. Robin Boylorn defines "crunk" as resisting conformity and confronting injustice out loud.
Host Cam Marston brings us fun weekly commentaries (opinion pieces) on generational and demographic trends to provide new ways to interpret the changing world around us.
After the Chernobyl disaster of 1986, hundreds of children from the affected areas dealt with multiple health issues caused by radiation from the nuclear meltdown. A few years later, families from all across Alabama housed many of those same children for a summer to give them access to better healthcare and a reprieve from the radiation.