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Can't take the heat? Here are some ways to stay cool

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Because so many places are overheated, we asked our listeners for their tips.

RAWANA BASI: My name is Rawana Basi (ph). I live in Charlotte, N.C. I stay cool by wearing clothes made out of fabrics such as cotton or linen. The breathable fabrics really help me stay cool in the summer, especially as a Muslim woman who dresses modestly.

NATHAN ZHU: My name is Nathan Zhu (ph). I live in McLean, Va. And I stay cool by washing my face with cold water, especially behind the ears.

ELLEN CRAVEN: My name is Ellen Craven (ph). I live in Jackson, Miss. Recently, we had a power outage that lasted five days, so our AC was out. And the way I fell asleep at night was I would cover myself in peppermint oil. And this really cools you down. It makes you shiver. And I would get under the covers and shiver until I fell asleep.

ELIZABETH MAYANS: My name is Elizabeth Mayans (ph). I live in Eugene, Ore. And I stay cool by trying not to use my oven or stove at all in the summer.

JENNIFER CURRY: Jennifer Curry (ph). I live in Guanacaste, Costa Rica. Our local Walmart does have the best AC in town, so occasionally you can find me lounging in the furniture section to cool off.

BRANDON SCHUETZ: My name is Brandon Schuetz (ph), and I live in Potsdam, Germany. But I just moved from Austin, Texas. And I stay cool by cracking windows at night and using fans during the day.

SIENNA SULLIVAN: Sienna Sullivan (ph), and I live in New York City. And I stay cool in the summer by eating frozen fruit.

LILLIE PRICE: Lillie Price (ph). I live in Suva, Fiji, so it's hot and humid. I stay cool by wearing dresses, as do most Fijian women. And men wear a sulu, which is pretty similar to a skirt. We all do it for that ventilation factor.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CRUEL SUMMER")

BANANARAMA: (Singing) It's a cruel, cruel, cruel summer.

INSKEEP: (Laughter) I love the collective wisdom there from around the world, listeners around the world. You know, one thing that I do, Leila - and maybe you will relate to this. I learned from reporting in Pakistan and in various countries - Iraq, countries in the Middle East - to long sleeves, long pants.

LEILA FADEL, HOST:

Yeah.

INSKEEP: Like, and I'll do that here in the United States. Just keep the sun off yourself.

FADEL: Yeah. I mean, I grew up in Saudi Arabia. I didn't even know what winter was until I was, like, 15.

INSKEEP: (Laughter).

FADEL: So I just stay inside or I stay in water. That's my - those are my tips.

INSKEEP: Oh, you can relate to the person who said I go to Walmart for the best air conditioning.

FADEL: Air conditioner all the way.

INSKEEP: There you go. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by an NPR contractor. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.

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