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An Alabama went into effect that requires public schools to provide changing rooms for students based on the sex on their birth certificates. This measure is one of over sixty that went into effect on Friday. Starting this school year, every student will have to use a the restroom or locker room designated to their biological sex.
News & Commentaries From APR
  • It's up to you to protect your best friend, and the 4th of July you may have to work extra hard to do that!
  • Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg is announcing a $1 billion dollar first-of-its-kind pilot program aimed at helping reconnect cities. The goal is change road projects that resulted in racially segregated or divided neighborhoods that were created by road projects. Buttigieg is pledging wide-ranging help to dozens of communities despite the program's limited dollars. Alabama has been criticized for this in the past.
  • There will be extra fireworks in Tuscaloosa this Fourth of July.
  • The city of Gulf Shores is holding a public meeting for its upcoming beach nourishment project. The meeting is at six tonight at the Gulf Shores City Council Chambers. The Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Orange Beach representatives and coastal engineers will answer questions about the project.
  • Alabama Public Radio is celebrating forty years on the air in 2022. The APR news team is diving into our archives to bring you encore airings of the best of our coverage. That includes this story from 2020. APR student intern Sydney Melson produced this feature on so called “segregation academies” in Alabama. Here’s thaty story from the APR archives
  • The family of a former U.S. soldier from Tuscaloosa being held captive in Ukraine says he’s made contact. A release from the family of Alex Drueke says he was able to send a direct communication to his family over the weekend. Drueke’s captors reportedly reached the U.S. State Department by telephone and allowed him to speak.
  • Monday marks the start of the first full week since the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Roe Versus Wade decision legalizing abortion. A Montgomery federal judge also just removed an injunction to a 2019 Alabama law that makes abortions a felony. The West Alabama Women’s Center in Tuscaloosa provided fifty percent of the procedures in the state. The clinic says one hundred patients have already been turned away.
  • A Montgomery federal judge lifted an injunction against Alabama’s 2019 Human Life Protection Act, officially making abortions a felony in the state. Judge Myron Thompson order states that the legal argument against Alabama’s ban no longer exists following action by the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down the Roe Versus Wade decision that gave constitutional protections to women seeking end their pregnancies.
Now a retired English professor at The University of Alabama, Dr. Noble's specialties are Southern and American literature.
Speaking of Pets with host Mindy Norton is a commentary (opinion piece) for people who care about pets and humane treatment for animals in general, and who want to celebrate that special relationship between us and our animal companions.
Crunk Culture is a commentary (opinion piece) about creative and sometimes cursory perspectives and responses to popular culture and representations of identity. Dr. Robin Boylorn defines "crunk" as resisting conformity and confronting injustice out loud.
Host Cam Marston brings us fun weekly commentaries (opinion pieces) on generational and demographic trends to provide new ways to interpret the changing world around us.
Children of Chernobyl.JPG
After the Chernobyl disaster of 1986, hundreds of children from the affected areas dealt with multiple health issues caused by radiation from the nuclear meltdown. A few years later, families from all across Alabama housed many of those same children for a summer to give them access to better healthcare and a reprieve from the radiation.