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Arraignment delayed again for suspect charged with murdering Tupac Shakur

Duane Davis, 60, appeared briefly in a Las Vegas court on Thursday. His arraignment has been delayed a second time until Nov. 2.
John Locher
/
AFP via Getty Images
Duane Davis, 60, appeared briefly in a Las Vegas court on Thursday. His arraignment has been delayed a second time until Nov. 2.

Duane "Keffe D" Davis, the suspect charged with murdering rapper Tupac Shakur in 1996, did not enter a plea in a Las Vegas court Thursday morning, because his legal representation isn't settled.

Davis' new attorney, Ross Goodman, asked the court for a two-week delay to confirm counsel. The judge, Tierra Jones, said that if Goodman and Davis are not ready by Nov. 2, she will appoint a public defender.

"In two weeks, we're going to get this case moving," Jones said.

This is the second time Davis' arraignment has been delayed because of lack of legal counsel.

Goodman is well known in Las Vegas as a criminal defense attorney. His mother, Carolyn Goodman, is the current third-term mayor of Las Vegas; his father, Oscar B. Goodman, also served three terms as the city's mayor.

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Anastasia Tsioulcas is a reporter on NPR's Arts desk. She is intensely interested in the arts at the intersection of culture, politics, economics and identity, and primarily reports on music. Recently, she has extensively covered gender issues and #MeToo in the music industry, including backstage tumult and alleged secret deals in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations against megastar singer Plácido Domingo; gender inequity issues at the Grammy Awards and the myriad accusations of sexual misconduct against singer R. Kelly.
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