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Toyota recalls nearly 1.9M RAV4s to fix batteries that can move during hard turns

The Toyota logo is seen on a dealership, Aug. 15, 2019, in Manchester, N.H. Toyota said Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2023, that it is recalling nearly 1.9 million RAV4 small SUVs in the U.S. to fix a problem with batteries that can move during forceful turns and potentially cause a fire.
Charles Krupa
/
AP
The Toyota logo is seen on a dealership, Aug. 15, 2019, in Manchester, N.H. Toyota said Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2023, that it is recalling nearly 1.9 million RAV4 small SUVs in the U.S. to fix a problem with batteries that can move during forceful turns and potentially cause a fire.

DETROIT — Toyota said Wednesday it is recalling nearly 1.9 million RAV4 small SUVs in the U.S. to fix a problem with batteries that can move during forceful turns and potentially cause a fire.

The recall covers certain RAV4s from the 2013 through 2018 model years. Toyota said in a statement that some replacement 12-volt batteries used in the SUVs have smaller top dimensions than others. If the hold-down clamp is not tightened properly, the battery could move, allowing the positive terminal to contact the clamp and short circuit, the company said.

Toyota said it is still preparing a fix. When the remedy is ready, dealers will replace the hold-down clamp, battery tray and positive terminal cover with improved ones. The company said it will notify owners by late December.

Toyota declined to say if the problem had caused any fires, crashes or injuries.

Owners can check to see if their RAV4s are involved by going to www.nhtsa.gov/recalls and entering their vehicle identification number.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

The Associated Press
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