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When Sgt. Alan Van't Land of the Colorado Springs Police Department approaches two young black men in the 2100 block of Preuss Road in Colorado Springs, he tells them he is responding to a call about a possible assault.

He says the men match suspect descriptions and he has been informed one of them may have a gun.

The FDA has approved a new drug that promises a simpler and far more effective treatment for drug-resistant tuberculosis. But not everyone is celebrating.

Doctors Without Borders has concerns about a critical bottom-line issue: How much will the drug cost in poor and middle-income countries, where most TB patients reside?

The stakes are so high because the difference between the new regimen — involving a drug called pretomanid — and the current drug regimen is so dramatic.

The writer-director Richard Linklater has said that he cast Cate Blanchett in his new comedy, Where'd You Go, Bernadette, because, in his words, "only a genius can portray a genius believably."

Ever since George R. R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series stole our hearts, minds, and television screens, fantasy literature has gained a reputation for being so grim and dark that there's a whole subgenre of it called, unimaginatively, grimdark. But it was not always thus. Granted, in the '70s and '80s, fantasy contained plenty of proto-grimdark works, most notably Stephen R. Donaldson's The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant and Roger Zelazny's Amber books.

Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy

Aug 16, 2019

Quebec-born, Polish-descenced, and now a New York local, the trilingual food enthusiast Antoni Porowski is best known as one fifth of Queer Eye's fab five. In each episode, this enthusiastic group sets out to transform the life of one woefully unkempt "hero." Each member of the team has a niche and, although he isn't professionally trained, Porowski serves as the show's food and wine connoisseur. Now that Porowski has worked in this role over the show's four seasons, to date, he's gearing up to release his own cookbook: Antoni in the Kitchen.

Straight from the Greek

Aug 16, 2019

Contestants are given commonplace English words and are asked to correctly identify their obscure Greek origin.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

To All The Bays I've Loved Before

Aug 16, 2019

Ophira Eisenberg and guest announcer Cecil Baldwin read love notes addressed to geographic B-A-Y bays, written as if they were B-A-E baes — accompanied with some very sensual sax by guest musician Julian Velard.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

Double-O No!

Aug 16, 2019

In this word game, every answer is a two-word phrase in which the first word contains a double-O. One of the Os is removed to create the second word.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

Shine On, You Crazy Neil Diamond

Aug 16, 2019

Upon the news that a Neil Diamond musical is in development, guest musician Julian Velard jumps into action with a music parody reworking Neil Diamond hits to make them about other real people with Broadway musicals based on them.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

Antoni

Aug 16, 2019

Queer Eye's food and wine expert Antoni Porowski returns to the stage to play a multiple choice game about one of his favorite dog breeds, corgis.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

M&Ms

Aug 16, 2019

In this final round every word begins and ends with the letter M.

Heard on Antoni Porowski: Queer Eye For The Quiz Guy.

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Maybelle Carter apparently made a mean chicken gizzard soup, which called for chicken livers, necks and backs, besides the gizzards. Her daughter June Carter Cash published that recipe, along with a host of others, in Mother Maybelle's Cookbook: A Kitchen Visit With America's First Family of Song in 1989, a little over a decade after her mother's passing. Only those who'd had the privilege of being guests in Maybelle's home had witnessed what she could do with soup pots and frying pans in the name of painstaking hospitality.

I was excited to get my hands on a copy of The Silence Between Us, as I had yet to review a book for this column featuring a deaf protagonist. I was doubly delighted to know that the story had been written by someone who is herself part of the deaf community — Alison Gervais suffered permanent hearing loss at a very young age, and is hard of hearing. Even the book's cover image is #OwnVoices, designed by deaf artist Nancy Rourke. I was absolutely ready to lose myself in a good book that both respected and celebrated deaf culture, and I was not disappointed.

Barbara King: Do Animals Grieve?

Aug 16, 2019

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Anthropomorphic.

About Barbara King's TED Talk

In 2018, an orca made headlines when she carried her dead calf on her back for weeks. Barbara King says this was a display of animal grief and explains how this changes our relationship with animals.

About Barbara King

Deinse Herzing: Do Dolphins Have A Language?

Aug 16, 2019

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Anthropomorphic

About Denise Herzing's TED Talk

We know that dolphins make distinctive clicks and whistles. But is that a language? Researcher Denise Herzing thinks it might be — and for the past 35 years — she's been working on unlocking it.

About Denise Herzing

One of the biggest fears of the fresh fruit industry just came true.

A fungal disease that has been destroying banana plantations in Asia has arrived in Latin America.

"For me, the worst moment was [seeing] the first pictures," says Fernando Alexander García-Bastidas, a banana researcher at the Dutch company Keygene, who carried out tests confirming what had happened.

You're at brunch with your friends on Sunday morning and after stuffing yourself with pancakes and mimosas, your server comes up to you and says, "Is this going to be on one check or — "

"Separate!" you all proclaim, barely taking a breath to pause from your conversation.

And why would you? It's pretty customary to pay for your own meal, or to go Dutch.

But it wasn't always the norm to split the check when going out with friends. In fact, in early English society, it was seen as selfish to invite someone out to eat and not pay for their meal.

The CEO of Cathay Pacific Airways, Hong Kong's flagship carrier, stepped down Friday, following a chaotic week that began with thousands of pro-democracy protesters overwhelming Hong Kong International Airport.

CEO Rupert Hogg led Cathay Pacific Group for three years, but on Friday, the company announced he was leaving.

"These have been challenging weeks for the airline," Hogg said, adding that he took responsibility as the leader of the company.

Katy Milkman played tennis at Princeton, and when she finished college, she went to the gym every day. But when she started grad school, her fitness routine went south.

"At the end of a long day of classes, I was exhausted," Milkman says. "Frankly, the last thing I wanted to do was drag myself to the gym. What I really wanted to do was watch TV or read Harry Potter."

"There is never any end," John Coltrane said sometime in the mid-1960s, at the height of his powers. "There are always new sounds to imagine; new feelings to get at." Coltrane, one of jazz's most revered saxophonists, was speaking to Nat Hentoff about an eternal quest — a compulsion to reach toward the next horizon, and the next.

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Two things stand out about Olga Tokarczuk's novel Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead. The first is that the book, first published in Polish in 2009 and newly translated by Antonia Lloyd-Jones, doesn't seem dated in the slightest; in fact, it fits rather well into much more contemporary literary concerns about nature and the impact humans have on it, and the cruelty of hunting and killing animals (Lauren Groff's wonderful Florida comes to mind).

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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When Elizabeth Coffey-Williams first came out to her family as transgender in the late 1960s, the language of gender identity wasn't what it is today.

"A lot of the words that they have today, like transgender and non-binary, they didn't have them," Elizabeth, who was in her early 20s at the time, told her niece Jennifer Coffey in a recent StoryCorps interview.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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A standard river barge can hold about the same amount as 60 semitrucks. In early June, 642 of them had floated to a standstill near American Commercial Barge Line's office outside Cairo, Ill.

"That's just me. That's not the other fleets in the area," said Mark Glaab, facility manager there. "That's just ACBL."

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