Associated Press

The Associated Press is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering, supplying a steady stream of news to its members, international subscribers and commercial customers. AP is neither privately owned nor government-funded; instead, it's a not-for-profit news cooperative owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members.

Parsons Government Services Inc.
parsons.com / Parsons Government Services Inc.

 

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama company has a contract worth nearly $40 million for mine-resistant, laser-equipped vehicles to disarm unexploded bombs and mines at a distance on airfields. The vehicles also have extendable arms to move debris. 

The Pentagon’s list of contracts signed Wednesday includes one for Parsons Government Services Inc. of Huntsville to build 13 fully operational vehicles and three systems of spares by September 2023.

Auburn University

 

AUBURN, Ala. (AP) — Auburn University is asking fans to avoid rolling its replanted oak trees with toilet paper as football games begin on campus. 

A statement from the school says two oaks that were planted in 2017 and 10 descendant trees all had a good growing season this year. But a specialist says the trees still need special care, and a ban on rolling will allow time for them to become acclimated to their environment.

 

OPELIKA, Ala. (AP) — Prosecutors say former Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard doesn’t deserve any reduction of his four-year prison sentence for ethics violations.

The state attorney general's office argues in court documents that Hubbard hasn’t shown remorse and was convicted of serious crimes that undermined public trust. They asked a judge to reject Hubbard's request to lessen his four-year prison sentence.

Records show Hubbard is currently in the Lee County Jail in Opelika.

 

GUIN, Ala. (AP) — City officials in Alabama have dropped a lawsuit filed against chemical giant 3M that alleged chemicals from the company’s facility had made its way into a creek supplying drinking water to the city. 

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — A panel will consider what to do with Alabama's existing prisons as the state moves forward with plans for three new, privately built lockups. 

Gov. Kay Ivey's office announced Tuesday she's forming a 15-member commission to evaluate the state's prisons. It will make recommendations about whether to renovate them or even use the buildings for something else.

Pixabay

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — A feared increase in Alabama's coronavirus caseload after Labor Day get-togethers has yet to materialize two weeks after the holiday. 

That's got health officials cautiously optimistic about the state's progress in the pandemic.

 

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (AP) — A woman accused of fatally poisoning her husband with insulin stolen from the Alabama hospital where she worked as a nurse is being sued by his estate for wrongful death.

News outlets report that the estate of James Cappello filed suit Monday against Marjorie Nicole Cappello and the hospital.

Investigators said she gave her husband a fatal dose of insulin in September 2018. The lawsuit alleges she stole the insulin from the hospital, which it accuses of negligence.

FBI

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — An Auburn man was sentenced to 57 months for making false statements to the FBI during a terrorism investigation. 

Federal prosecutors said Nayef Amjad Qashou, 26, was given the sentence last week. Prosecutors said the FBI interviewed Qashou in 2018 after they received tips concerning behavior that indicated he might have an interest in joining ISIS. 

APR's Lynn Oldshue

 

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has declared a major disaster in three Alabama counties battered by Hurricane Sally. 

Storm surge and torrential rains swamped Mobile, Baldwin and Escambia Counties when slow-moving Sally made landfall Wednesday on Alabama's Gulf Coast. Two deaths in Alabama were linked to the storm — one drowning and another that occurred during the cleanup.

 

DECATUR, Ala. (AP) — A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit that sought to force the city of Decatur to follow the results of a 2010 referendum and adopt a city manager form of government.

The ruling by U.S. District Judge Abdul Kallon means that, for now at least, the north Alabama city can keep a full-time mayor. However, the plaintiff is considering an appeal and citizens are free to petition for another referendum.

Alabama archives
Associated Press

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Leaders in Alabama are confronting the legacy of what might be the grandest Confederate memorial of all: the state's Department of Archives and History.

Founded in 1901, the agency became a vast repository of Confederate records and artifacts. 

During the current national reckoning over race, its current leaders acknowledged the department once played a role in systemic racism by promoting “lost cause” narrative of Civil War history that was favored by some whites and all but excluding Blacks.

Sally cleanup
Associated Press

LOXLEY, Ala. (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of people are still without power along the Alabama coast and the Florida Panhandle in the aftermath of Hurricane Sally.

The power outages continued Friday as officials assessed millions of dollars in damage that included a broken bridge in Pensacola and ships thrown onto dry land. Two people were reported killed in Alabama.

gardenandgun.com

 

FAIRHOPE, Ala. (AP) — Winston Groom, the writer whose novel “Forrest Gump” was made into an Oscar winning 1994 movie that became an enduring cultural phenomenon, has died. 

His death was confirmed Thursday night by Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey and the mayor of Fairhope, Alabama, where Groom lived.

Morgan Hall
english.ua.edu

 

  

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — University of Alabama trustees are expected to vote on a proposal to change the name of a building on the Tuscaloosa campus that is currently named after a Confederate general. 

AL.com reports that the agenda for the trustees’ meeting on Thursday includes consideration of a resolution amending the name of Morgan Hall.

Mountain Top Industries
Mountain Top Industries

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — A company that specializes in aluminum roll covers for pickup trucks is building its first U.S. plant in Alabama. 

Al.com reports Mountain Top Industries, based in Denmark, said it plans to bring a $13.3 million, 73,000 square-foot manufacturing facility to Montgomery and create about 90 jobs.

The company said it will start production at the end of 2020 or in early 2021 and will supply North American markets.

Skilled Trades of West Alabama
Facebook

 

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — Aspiring plumbers, electricians and other trade workers will get a chance to advance their skills under a new apprenticeship program launched in Tuscaloosa. 

The Tuscaloosa News reports that the program by the nonprofit group Skilled Trades of West Alabama will hold an orientation session Monday for its first class of about 70 trainees.

en.wikipedia.org

 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Crowds gather every year at Birmingham's 16th Street Baptist Church to mark the anniversary of the day when a bomb planted by Ku Klux Klansmen went off just before worship, killing four Black girls. 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Democratic Sen. Doug Jones of Alabama has called Republican challenger Tommy Tuberville “Coach Clueless” for the former football coach's recent comments about the coronavirus. 

Jones attacked Tuberville in a campaign appearance Friday. He criticized Tuberville’s reaction to tapes of President Donald Trump saying in February he knew the severity of the coronavirus but had downplayed the threat to avoid public panic.

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — A former powerful Alabama House speaker has reported to jail to begin a four-year prison sentence for his 2016 ethics conviction.

Mike Hubbard reported Friday to a county detention center to begin the sentence after an  unsuccessful effort to overturn his conviction. The Alabama Supreme Court this spring overturned five of the counts in Hubbard’s ethics convictions while upholding six others.

Associated Press

 

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — White House coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx praised Alabama’s response to the pandemic, but expressed concern about the number of men she saw not wearing masks as she visited the state. 

Birx visited the University of Alabama on Friday in a tour of southern colleges responding to an outbreak of COVID-19 cases. She praised the response of the state and university, which has been the site of a recent outbreak.

Associated Press

 

MONTEVALLO, Ala. (AP) — An Army veteran who served in Afghanistan and was shot to death by police in Texas is being buried in his home state of Alabama on the anniversary of the 9/11 terror attacks. 

Relatives of Damian Daniels gathered at Alabama National Cemetery on Friday to honor the 30-year-old man.

Fort Rucker helicopters
U.S. Air Force

 

GADSDEN, Ala. (AP) — Helicopters and ground crews are looking for a small airplane that went missing in Alabama during a flight between Georgia and Mississippi. 

News outlets report that a plane with one person aboard disappeared from radar Thursday night northeast of Birmingham in Etowah County. The aircraft was reportedly flying between Tupelo, Mississippi, and Calhoun, Georgia.

 

FLORENCE, Ala. (AP) — A factory that employs hundreds of people manufacturing railroad cars in north Alabama is closing amid declining demand linked to the coronavirus pandemic. 

FreightCar America announced Thursday it's shutting down its plant at Cherokee and plans to abandon the facility by early next year to consolidate operations in Mexico. A local official says the factory has about 500 workers.

http://epa.gov/ / Environmental Protection Agency

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has taken a Superfund site in downtown Montgomery off its recommendations for a National Priorities List. 

The Alabama Department of Environmental Management announced the decision in a Wednesday news release.

Pixabay

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The Alabama Public Charter Commission’s virtual meeting was shut down after hackers displayed pornographic images, wrote profanity and made references to Hitler. 

AL.com reports the incident happened nearly 20 minutes after the Zoom meeting began Thursday. Hackers also played music and showed images of Shrek, the animated character. A new link was then sent to commissioners so they could resume the meeting.

 

ATHENS, Ala. (AP) — A former Alabama judge indicted on charges of using his office for personal gain will go on trial Nov. 16. 

In setting a trial date for former Limestone County Judge Douglas Lee Patterson, a court said the calendar was “firm.”

 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — A doctor and a pharmacist from Alabama have been sentenced to prison in what federal prosecutors describe as a prescription drug scam. 

A statement by federal authorities says a judge sentenced Dr. Paul Roberts of Fultondale to six years in prison on Wednesday. Pharmacist Stanley Reeves of Demopolis was sentenced to more than three years. Both men pleaded guilty to fraud-related charges.

James Halsell Jr.
Associated Press

 

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — A judge says Alabama prosecutors can use evidence collected by police after a former NASA astronaut crashed into another car while driving on a rural road, killing two girls. 

A Tuscaloosa County judge says jurors can hear that one-time space shuttle pilot James Halsell told police about drinking wine at a motel hours before the crash in June 2016. He also ruled that prosecutors can use evidence found in the room during a search.

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Absentee voting has started in Alabama with phones ringing constantly and a steady stream of voters at some county offices. 

In populous Mobile, workers in the absentee office barely had time to hang up on one call before the next one came in. Numerous people had cast ballots in Montgomery by lunchtime. And an official says an unusually large number of people requested absentee ballots early in Winston County.

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Officials in Alabama’s capital city have approved a hazard pay bonus for first responders and some workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic. 

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