Stan Ingold

Assistant News Director

Born in Morehead Kentucky, Stan Ingold got his start in public radio as a volunteer at Morehead State Public Radio.  He worked there throughout his college career as a reporter, host and producer and was hired on as the Morning Edition Host after graduating with a degree in History from Morehead State University. He remained there for nearly three years. Along with working in radio he spent a great deal of time coaching speech and forensics at Rowan County Senior High School in Morehead, working with students and teaching them broadcasting techniques for competitions. 

Stan arrived at Alabama Public Radio in March of 2011. Since then he has been busy criscrossing the state gathering news stories and bringing them to you, the listener. His story on the Key Underwood Coondog Memorial Cemetery recently earned him a regional Edward R Murrow Award for Feature Reporting.

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The first African American police officer in one Alabama city faced numerous death threats and bomb threats after he was hired in 1966, one of his daughters recalled after his funeral Saturday. 

Jimmy Lee Long was given the key to Phenix City in 2009. He was living in Columbus, Georgia, when he died April 19, at the age of 81.

The early days were "really trying times," Virginia Long-Roy told WTVM-TV of Columbus.

The nation's first memorial to lynching victims is adding a new monument to remember people killed during the 1950s in racially motivated attacks that often targeted early civil rights leaders.  

The Equal Justice Initiative on Monday will dedicate the new monument at the Peace and Justice Memorial Center in Montgomery.

The monument will commemorate 24 people slain during the 1950s, including Emmett Till and voting rights activists Harry and Harriette Moore.

A federal judge says he will rule next week on a request to intervene after a rash of suicides in Alabama prisons.  

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson on Thursday said he will issue an order next week.

Attorneys for prisoners asked Thompson to intervene after 15 inmates killed themselves within 15 months. They argued the state is not doing enough to prevent suicides and asked Thompson to order changes in how inmates are monitored and to restrict the use of solitary confinement.

(OPP, Ala.)-- Multiple festivals are taking place across the state as Alabama celebrates its bicentennial. But there is an event that takes place every year in Opp, Alabama that has some people’s skin crawling.  

 

Eastern diamondback rattlesnakes, or Crotalus adamanteus, were the slithering stars of the 59th annual Rattlesnake Rodeo about 85 miles south of Montgomery.

 

The county with Alabama's lowest unemployment rate is in need of more workers. 

WBRC-TV reports that employers in Shelby County just south of Birmingham are having trouble filling some jobs.

The county of more than 210,000 people has the lowest jobless rate in the state at 3.2 percent, and "help wanted" signs are a frequent site outside some businesses.

The Shelby County Chamber of Commerce says employers are constantly looking for qualified welders, forklift operators, and information technology assistants.

An African-American woman who took over the helm of a small-town Alabama newspaper that recently called for the Ku Klux Klan to "ride again" has stepped down after a few weeks, citing interference from the newspaper's owner.  

Elecia R. Dexter told The New York Times on Friday that she stepped down because of continuing interference from the newspaper's owner who had published the KKK editorial. Dexter said she wanted to maintain her "integrity and well-being."

Caroline Vincent

Alabama is going to be featured at the Oscars for the second year in a row. Last year the psychological thriller “Get Out” won best original screenplay and this year a documentary filmed in Alabama is up for the golden statue. 

“It’s about the south, but it’s about Daniel and Quincy’s lives," says Ramell Ross. He's the director of the documentary "Hale County This Morning, This Evening." It follows the lives of two men in Hale County, Alabama. Ross says it's more than that...

An Alabama law that prohibits cities from removing Confederate monuments will remain in effect while the state appeals a judge's ruling that declared the statute constitutional, the Alabama Supreme Court ruled Friday.  

Justices granted the request of Attorney General Steve Marshall to stay a judge's order striking down the law, Marshall's office announced.

"The Supreme Court's stay allows the Alabama Memorial Preservation Act to remain in effect until the Supreme Court resolves this appeal over the act's constitutionality," Marshall said in a statement.

fema,gov

President Donald Trump says he will nominate a former Alabama official to head the Federal Emergency Management Agency.  

Jeffrey Byard held several positions with the Alabama Emergency Management Agency before he joined FEMA in 2017 during the agency's response to Hurricanes Harvey in Texas and Irma in Florida. Byard is currently the associate administrator for the Office of Response and Recovery.

Former state Senator Myron Penn said Friday that he is running for chairman of the Alabama Democratic Party in new leadership elections ordered by national party officials.   

Penn said in a telephone interview that he hopes to help unify and rebuild a fractured party.

"I'm tired of sides. We shouldn't have sides within our family," Penn said.

Alabama is losing another rural hospital.    Georgiana Medical Center in Butler County is closing at the end of the next month.  

 Ivy Creek health care company, which owns the hospital, made the announcement Tuesday.

Homeless Care Council of Northwest Alabama

Alabama is taking part in a national effort to count the number of homeless in need of services.  The Homeless Care Council of Northwest Alabama is going over the numbers gathered from the Point in Time count conducted last week.    

          The “Point in Time” count is done by organizations all across the country to help get an accurate count of the homeless. Those numbers are then given to the Department of Housing and Urban Development where they allocate funds for programs based on the need.

A police officer has been shot to death in Mobile, Alabama. 

Mobile Police Chief Lawrence Batiste told reporters that Officer Sean Tuder was gunned down Sunday afternoon. Batiste said one suspect has been taken into custody. However, he said he could not immediately confirm if the 19-year-old suspect fired the shot that killed Tuder. Batiste said the suspect had several prior warrants.

National Weather Service

 Homes, businesses, government offices and churches were among the buildings badly damaged or demolished when tornadoes struck central Alabama over the weekend.  

The severe weather hit Saturday and another tornado was reported later that evening at an air base in the Florida Panhandle.

On Sunday, the National Weather Service says its initial surveys indicated there was an EF 1 tornado in Autauga County, and a stronger EF2 twister in Wetumpka, Alabama.

Alabama lawmakers could debate a possible gasoline tax increase to fund road and bridge construction when they return to Montgomery in March. 

While the specifics of the proposal are still being developed, Alabama House Speaker Mac McCutcheon said improving state infrastructure, and an accompanying gas tax, will be a major topic of the session.

Alabama's current state gas tax of 18 cents a gallon has been unchanged since 1992.

Rep. Bill Poole says Alabama has an infrastructure problem. He says the question is if lawmakers will try to address it.

An environmental group says it will help fund an event celebrating whooping cranes at a federal refuge in Alabama during the partial government 

shutdown. The annual Festival of the Cranes brings hundreds of people to the Wheeler Wildlife Refuge near Decatur. But the facility is closed because of the funding impasse in Washington. The Friends of Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge has agreed to cover electricity costs for two refuge buildings next weekend if the shutdown continues.

whitehouse.gov

Alabamians are remembering Former President George H.W. Bush today. David Alsobrook worked for the National Archives and was the director of the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library in Texas. Alsobrook, who now lives in Mobile got to know the Bush family and A-P-R’s Stan Ingold took some time to discuss with him what President Bush was like as a person…

Gage Skidemore / wikipedia.org

Former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich is giving the keynote address at an annual gathering of Alabama farmers. 

The Alabama Farmers Federation is holding its 97th annual meeting Sunday and Monday in Montgomery.

Gingrich will address the group Monday night.

The Alabama Farmers Federation says that over 1,200 farmers and guests have registered for the meeting. It is one of the state's largest gatherings of farmers.

The organization on Sunday gave its service to agriculture award to Alabama Agriculture Commissioner John McMillan.

Alabama is marking its first Rosa Parks Day. Alabama lawmakers earlier 

this year voted to designate December first as a day to honor the civil rights icon.

Parks, an African-American woman, was arrested after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a segregated bus in Montgomery on Dececember first, 1955.

Her action ignited the yearlong Montgomery bus boycott and helped usher in the civil rights movement.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson delivered the eulogy for an African-American man shot to death by a police officer following a shooting at a crowded Alabama shopping mall.  

Funeral services were held for 21-year-old Emantic "EJ" Fitzgerald Bradford, Jr. on Saturday in Birmingham. 

A police officer in nearby Hoover shot and killed Bradford on Thanksgiving night while responding to a shooting at a crowded shopping mall.

Police later acknowledged he was not the gunman in the shooting that wounded two people.

wikipedia.org

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor was on hand in Mobile, Alabama, to christen a U.S. Navy ship.  

Al.com repoertsthat the USNS Puerto Rico was christened Saturday at the Austal USA shipyard, where it was built. Sotomayor broke a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow, a Navy tradition.

The Puerto Rico was the 11th of 12 Expeditionary Fast Transport ships to be built by Austal under a $1.9 billion contract.

Alabama's growing population means state driver licenses will get an additional digit.  

The Alabama Law Enforcement Agency says it's adding an eighth digit to all new driver licenses issued by the state beginning Dec. 1.

The department says people who hold the roughly 5.9 million valid licenses already issued by the state won't be affected by the change. Their seven-digit licenses will remain valid.

Stan Ingold / Alabama Public Radio

Alabama has a long and complicated history with the Ten Commandments from the Old Testament of the Bible. This election day, voters will decide if that relationship will continue as is. 

           When actor Charleton Heston delivered the Ten Commandments in the 1956 Cecil B. DeMille movie classic, his Moses didn’t seem interested in politics. Two thousand years later, here in Alabama, things are different…

Double-nickel — the 55-mph speed limit— is still common on highways across the South.

Now, Alabama is adding a new limit: A quarter and a penny.

Al.com reports, Alabama 135 now has a 26-mph (42 kph) speed limit through Gulf State Park.  

It's on a stretch of highway in south Alabama. The speed limit there used to be 35-mph (56 kph).

The idea is that drivers will take note of the speed limit since it is an unusual one, Gulf Shores Police Chief Edward Delmore said.

Stan Ingold / Alabama Public Radio

               

This year we’re studying at all of Alabama’s Capitals. We have already looked at the territorial capital of St. Stephens and the controversial role Huntsville plays in the story. This time we're looking at Alabama’s first official state capital…one that was built out of the wilderness…

     Its quiet and peaceful at this remote location in south central Alabama on the confluence of the Alabama and Cahaba rivers. But at one time, this was the bustling capital city of the newly formed state of Alabama. 

Alabama is accepting comments on its proposal to put a work requirement on 74,000 Medicaid recipients.  

The Alabama Medicaid Agency opened a new public comment period on the proposal.

The proposal would require 35 hours of work, job training, education or volunteer service each week. Exceptions would be made for people with young or disabled children

The Alabama Department of Public Health has identified an outbreak of whooping cough in Shelby and Jefferson counties.  

Health officials said Friday that nine children testified positive for pertussis, also known as whooping cough. Another 22 people have developed symptoms.

Pertussis is a highly contagious respiratory disease. It begins with a runny nose and low grade fever but develops into a violent cough.

Health officials identified a number of churches and camps where the infected people attended in June and July.

State Red Snapper Season Ends 6 Weeks Early

Jul 23, 2018

The recreational red snapper season in Alabama’s state waters has closed six weeks earlier than originally expected.

The Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources closed the state season Sunday. The agency had originally planned to keep the fishing season open until September 3.

Alabama Marine Resources Division Director Scott Bannon says the quota of nearly 985 thousand pounds of snapper allocated to Alabama under NOAA guidelines has already been caught.

Back-to-School Tax Holiday This Weekend

Jul 20, 2018

Students in Alabama are heading back to school soon, and their families will get some help getting them ready.

This weekend is the Back to School Sales Tax Holiday. This means sales taxes will not be charged on items needed to get kids ready for school.

Melissa Warnke is the spokeswoman for the Alabama Retail Association. She says only the four percent state sales tax is guaranteed to be removed, but many cities and counties are also participating…

EPA to Investigate ADEM Civil Rights Policies

Jul 6, 2018

The state of Alabama is going under the microscope again in terms of civil rights policy.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's civil rights office says it will investigate the Alabama Department of Environmental Management's civil rights policies.

Al.com reports The EPA's External Civil Rights Compliance Office issued a letter earlier this week stating it will investigate whether ADEM has adopted grievance procedures assuring the prompt and fair resolution of complaints. These procedures are required by the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

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