Digital Media Center
Bryant-Denny Stadium, Gate 61
920 Paul Bryant Drive
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0370
(800) 654-4262

© 2024 Alabama Public Radio
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

'Far Worse Than I Ever Dreamed': Candidates React To Iran Deal

A historic agreement with Iran over its nuclear program was negotiated in part by the Obama administration and heavily praised by the president. "This deal offers an opportunity to move in a new direction," Obama said Tuesday morning. Congress has 60 days to review the deal, and if it goes through, of course, following through on that "new direction" will largely be up to the next president.

The candidates clamoring for that title had something to say about it.

Lindsey Graham told Bloomberg the deal is "far worse than I ever dreamed it could be." Marco Rubio, in one of a series of tweets, said "it will be left to the next President to return us to a position of American strength and re-impose sanctions on this despicable regime." Rubio's campaign quickly put up a petition opposing the deal and asked his supporters to sign it. Scott Walker, who just entered the race yesterday, said the agreement "will be remembered as one of America's worst diplomatic failures."

Bobby Jindal called on Hillary Clinton to "be a voice of reason and oppose the deal."

Clinton, speaking about the deal following a meeting with Democrats on Capitol Hill, said the deal "is an important step that puts a lid on Iran's nuclear programs." She also said it will enable the U.S. and its partners to turn its attention to preventing "Iran's other bad actions."

Others on the Democratic side were more congratulatory of the Obama administration. Jim Webb called the deal an "important moment in terms of the future of American policy," and Bernie Sanders called it a "victory for diplomacy over saber-rattling."

Here's what the candidates are saying about the agreement (we will continue to update):

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Amita Kelly is a Washington editor, where she works across beats and platforms to edit election, politics and policy news and features stories.
News from Alabama Public Radio is a public service in association with the University of Alabama. We depend on your help to keep our programming on the air and online. Please consider supporting the news you rely on with a donation today. Every contribution, no matter the size, propels our vital coverage. Thank you.