Blue Bell To Start Test Production, Selma March Photos At Auction

Jul 9, 2015

Blue Bell plant, Sylacauga, Ala.

Blue Bell is beginning a trial run of ice cream production at its Sylacauga plant after a national recall due to a series of listeria illnesses.

Alabama Health Officer Don Williamson said yesterday that Blue Bell notified his department that it will begin a trial run of production later this month. The ice cream will not be sold to consumers. Williamson says both state health officials and Blue Bell will test the product for listeria.

The company issued a national recall and shut down production after the company's ice cream was linked to 10 listeria illnesses in four states as well as three deaths in Kansas.

The contaminated products have been found at the company's Texas and Oklahoma plants, but although listeria was found in the Sylacauga plant, none of its products had been found to be contaminated.

Images of Alabama’s fight for civil rights are about to hit center stage in Indianapolis.

Photos from the historic Civil Rights march from Selma to Montgomery will be on display during the 45th annual Indiana Black Expo Summer Celebration, which begins today.

Jennifer Darby is the Director of Youth and Family Programs for the IBE. She says the photos are an important part of history.

“With it being the 50th anniversary of Selma, we actually wanted to look back at history from where we started and from where we are now.”

The photos will be available for auction later this month. The expo will donate the proceeds to its scholarship fund to provide financial assistance to Indiana undergrads and high school seniors.

People who are new to the business world across Alabama are getting ready to converge on Birmingham tomorrow.

The Young Professionals Summit is a networking event for new entrepreneurs, business owners, and non-profits.

Dionne Clark is Program Director of the Alabama Humanities Foundation. Her group sponsors the Summit. She says the point is to reach out to different young professionals throughout the city and the state.

“Birmingham has a very robust and involved young professional community. So we saw that as an opportunity to increase awareness and reaching a younger more diverse demographic.”

Awards will be given out in each category to young professionals from Birmingham, Huntsville, Mobile and Montgomery.

The head of the Alabama Historical Commission says her department has removed "a small number" of Confederate battle flag items from the Alabama Capitol gift shop.

The commission's acting executive director Lisa Jones says commission management removed the merchandise after Confederate flags were taken down from Capitol grounds last month.

Jones says the items removed featured the Confederate battle flag on the item or on packaging. She says a "large number" of books, souvenirs, and other Civil War-related items remain available for purchase.

The site director for Confederate Memorial Park, also managed by the historical commission, said their park received the items to sell.