NAACP sues Alabama over its voter identification law, Greene County Job Fair

Dec 2, 2015

A civil rights group has filed a lawsuit against the state of Alabama, claiming that its law requiring voters to have photo identification will prevent thousands from casting ballots.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and Greater Birmingham Ministries filed the federal lawsuit today.

The lawsuit cites state estimates that at least 280,000 people will be disenfranchised because of the law.

The complaint says those affected are disproportionately black and Hispanic, and it says that amounts to intentional racial discrimination.

The state attorney general's office had no immediate comment.

A requirement that went into effect last year requires voters to show valid, state-issued photo identification at polling places. The state's Republican-controlled Legislature approved the law in 2011, saying it was meant to prevent fraud.

Jobseekers in and around Greene County had some help finding employment today. A-P-R- student reporter Nia Craig has more on the local job fair…

The Alabama Career Center System, Greene County Industrial Development Authority, West Alabama Works and the Greene County Board of Education held a job fair for area residents today.

Donny Jonas is the chief operating officer for the West Alabama Chamber of Commerce. He says the more opportunities companies have to seek and meet qualified candidates; the more engaged they will be to participate in these events.

“Well I think it’s very important for our citizens to understand that the Department of Labor, our regional councils and the local communities are working together to put on events like this and we hope to see more of these types of events like this in rural Alabama to bring jobs to those local communities.”

DCH Health System, Alabama Power Company and other agencies were represented at the job fair.

A new national housing survey shows Birmingham apartment renters are loyal customers.

The National Multifamily Housing Council released key insights on apartment renters’ preferences. The group questioned one hundred and twenty apartment dwellers on their buying habits.

Rick Haughey** is the Vice President of Industry Technology Initiatives at the Council. He says the group analyzed how Birmingham differs from the some of the national results…

“We saw a higher percentage than average of renters who plan to buy within the next five years. So you have a lot of renters from what I can see who are coming to Birmingham maybe for a job and are planning on settling there, which is good news for your community.”

Haughey says interest in sustainability in Birmingham is lower than national. Satellite television interest is higher than national.