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How you can grow new brain cells

Updated November 11, 2022 at 10:25 AM ET

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Life Stages Of The Brain

Adults don't generate as many new neurons as children or teenagers, but some growth is still happening. Neuroscientist Sandrine Thuret explains how we can encourage the production of more nerve cells.

About Sandrine Thuret

Sandrine Thuret is a neuroscientist studying adult neurogenesis — the process by which adult brains produce new nerve cells. She leads the Adult Neurogenesis and Mental Health Lab at King's College London.

She is also Deputy Head of the Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience and the Chair of King's Research Degrees Examination Board.

Thuret received her B.S. from the University of Burgundy, M.S. in Bioengineering from the University of Clermont-Ferrand, Polytech Engineering Institute, M.S. in Aging Biology from the University of Lyon, and Ph.D. in Neuroscience from Heidelberg University.

This segment of TED Radio Hour was produced by Christina Cala and edited by Sanaz Meshkinpour. You can follow us on Twitter @TEDRadioHour and email us at TEDRadio@npr.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Manoush Zomorodi is the host of TED Radio Hour. She is a journalist, podcaster and media entrepreneur, and her work reflects her passion for investigating how technology and business are transforming humanity.
Christina Cala is a producer for Code Switch. Before that, she was at the TED Radio Hour where she piloted two new episode formats — the curator chat and the long interview. She's also reported on a movement to preserve African American cultural sites in Birmingham and followed youth climate activists in New York City.
Sanaz Meshkinpour
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