abortion

The latest fallout related to Alabama’s new abortion law could occur this week in Tuscaloosa.

The University of Alabama's board of trustees will consider whether to return a record $21.5M gift. The donor encouraged students to boycott the university following passage of Alabama’s controversial abortion law that makes performing an abortion a felony in virtually all cases.

The legal battle over the Alabama’s abortion ban officially got underway last week. Both the American Civil Liberties Union of Alabama and Planned Parenthood Southeast filed suit on behalf of the state’s three abortion clinics. They say the new law is blatantly unconstitutional. But lawmakers say that was the plan all along.

APR’s Alex AuBuchon has more on what’s next for Alabama’s controversial abortion ban.


abortion rally
Butch Dill / AP

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — A federal lawsuit filed Friday asks a judge to block an Alabama law that outlaws almost all abortions, the most far-reaching attempt by a conservative state to seek new restrictions on the procedure.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama lawmakers are expected to vote Tuesday evening on a proposal to outlaw almost all abortions in the state, a hardline measure that has splintered Republicans over its lack of an exception for pregnancies resulting from rape or incest.

The bill before the GOP-dominated Alabama Senate would make performing an abortion at any stage of pregnancy a felony. The only exception would be for when the woman's health is at serious risk.

"Our bill says that baby in the womb is a person," said Republican Rep. Terri Collins, the bill's sponsor.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The Alabama House voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to outlaw almost all abortions in the state as conservatives took aim at the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

The Republican-dominated House of Representatives voted 74-3 for legislation that would make it a felony to perform an abortion at any stage in a woman's pregnancy. The proposal passed after Democrats walked out of the chamber after sometimes emotional debate with opponents and supporters crowding the gallery. The bill now moves to the Alabama Senate.

abortion protest
Mickey Welsh / Montgomery Advertiser via AP

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama lawmakers on Wednesday advanced one of the most stringent abortion restrictions in the nation, a measure that would make performing an abortion a felony with almost no exceptions.

The House Health Committee voted to send the bill to the House of Representatives floor. The vote came after a sometimes emotional public hearing as women on both sides described their past decisions with abortion and opponents protested outside the Statehouse.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama lawmakers are set to hold a public hearing Wednesday on legislation before a House committee that seeks to outlaw almost all abortions in the state, what critics call one of the most extremely anti-abortion proposals in the country.

The bill would make performing an abortion a felony, punishable between 10 and 99 years in prison, although a woman would not be charged for having the procedure under the proposal.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama lawmakers are proposing to outlaw almost all abortions as conservatives take aim at the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion.

Alabama lawmakers on Tuesday will introduce legislation to make it a felony to perform an abortion at any stage of pregnancy unless the mother's health is in jeopardy. If enacted, it would be the most restrictive in the country and certain to be challenged in court.

The state of Alabama plans to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the state's effort to ban the most commonly used second trimester abortion procedure.

Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall's office on Tuesday asked the court for additional time to file its petition for review.

In 2016, Alabama lawmakers voted to ban the abortion procedure known as dilation and evacuation. A federal judge blocked the law as an unconstitutional restriction on abortion access.

In August of this year, the 11th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals upheld the decision.

An Alabama state court says a 12-year-old girl who was impregnated by a relative will be allowed to get an abortion without a parent’s consent.

Yesterday, the Alabama Civil Court of Appeals ruled in favor of a girl seeking a waiver from a state law that requires minors receive parental consent before having an abortion. The decision says a relative currently charged with statutory rape got the girl pregnant, and the girl was removed from her home after her mother reacted violently. The girl doesn’t know her father.

A bill in the Alabama Legislature would require women seeking abortions to get a sonogram two days ahead of the procedure and hear a detailed description of the embryo or fetus. 

The Senate Health Committee has scheduled a Wednesday public hearing on the bill by Republican Sen. Gerald Allen of Tuscaloosa. A federal appeals court in 2014 blocked a similar North Carolina ultrasound law.

Today is Pro-Life Day in Alabama.

At least, that’s according to Alabama House Speaker Mac McCutcheon and other leaders in the state legislature.

A federal judge has temporarily blocked the enforcement of new state laws banning abortion clinics near schools and outlawing a commonly used second trimester abortion procedure.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson issued an order yesterday delaying enforcement of the laws that were set to take effect Aug. 1. Thompson scheduled an Oct. 4 hearing on a request from abortion providers to permanently block the laws.

Lawyers for Alabama abortion providers have asked a federal judge to block new state laws that ban abortion clinics near schools as well as a commonly-used second trimester abortion procedure.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson scheduled a telephone conference on the request for a temporary restraining order. Unless blocked by federal court, the new laws will go into effect August 1.

A bill to prohibit a commonly used second-trimester abortion procedure has advanced in the Alabama Legislature.

The Senate voted 30-2 today for Republican Sen. Phil Williams' bill. A companion bill in the House has passed out of committee.

The legislation would prohibit a procedure called dilation and evacuation, or "D&E." The bill would allow the procedure in the event of a "serious health risk to the mother."

The bill's supporters describe the procedure as "heinous" and "barbaric."

A bill in the Alabama Legislature that would have effectively banned abortion in the state has failed to make it to a vote during the current legislative session.

Bill sponsor Representative Ed Henry (R) says the bill is "essentially dead". House Democrats mounted an effective filibuster earlier this week, and the House of Representatives adjourned before voting on the bill.

Committees in Alabama’s House of Representatives passed two notable bills yesterday. One would prevent abortion clinics from being located near public schools, and another would take the state of Alabama out of the marriage process entirely.

Legislators say the abortion bill is aimed at protecting students from the chaos of protestors outside abortion clinics. It would close an existing abortion facility in Huntsville, which was forced to move to its current location near a public school after the state mandated new facility requirements in 2013.

Alabama State House
Jay Williams / Flickr

The Alabama House of Representatives approved measures to cement the state’s right-to-work status and to ban the sale of fetal tissue yesterday.

One bill would amend the state’s constitution to prevent companies from requiring their employees to pay union dues as a condition of employment. The practice has already been prohibited under state law, but Republicans say adding the language to the state constitution will make Alabama more appealing to industry. Lawmakers fell three votes short of passing the measure last week. Yesterday, the bill passed 69-33.

A federal judge has temporarily suspended enforcement of a state regulation that threatened to close one of the state's busiest abortion clinics.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson says the closure of the Tuscaloosa clinic could prevent women from obtaining abortions.

The West Alabama Women's Center of Tuscaloosa is challenging a 2007 state regulation.  It requires clinics to hire a physician with hospital-admitting privileges to handle patient complications

Alabama State House
Jay Williams / Flickr

Alabama’s lawmakers are back in Montgomery for a special session to work on the budget.

Governor Robert Bentley is seeking a 25-cent-per-pack cigarette tax increase. He also wants to raise the business privilege tax on larger businesses while giving smaller ones a tax cut. The governor has also suggested ending the ability of taxpayers to claim a state income tax deduction when they pay their federal Social Security taxes.

Tuscaloosa Representative Bill Poole says he is not optimistic the legislature will draft a budget in this special session.

A federal judge says he will rule by Friday on a female prisoner's request for an abortion.

U.S. District Abdul Kallon made the comment after hearing arguments yesterday in a lawsuit filed by the woman.

The unnamed prisoner filed suit against Lauderdale County Sheriff Rick Singleton seeking a court order that would let her leave jail to travel to Huntsville for the procedure.

State lawmakers from Mobile and Baldwin Counties are drafting legislation to try and keep a large portion of the BP oil settlement money near Alabama’s Gulf Coast.

The proposed bill would request $500 million of the $1 billion currently destined for the state’s General Fund budget to instead be dedicated to the Gulf region. The projects that legislators would like to see funded in the area are primarily major road construction.

A Tuscaloosa abortion clinic is suing the state of Alabama over a regulation that could cause the facility to permanently close.

The West Alabama Women's Center filed the federal lawsuit against state health officials last week. The suit deals with a regulation requiring abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a local hospital, or a contract with a physician who does to handle patients with complications.

WBRC-TV

Two closed abortion clinics in Alabama have reopened, giving the state a total of five licensed clinics.

An attorney with the state health department says the Planned Parenthood Southeast clinic in Birmingham has reopened after taking corrective actions. The clinic closed in January after firing two employees for selling abortion medication to a person in the clinic parking lot. The clinic replaced its staff and made other changes.

Alabama Women's Center

An abortion clinic in Huntsville has won permission to relocate so it can comply with new state restrictions.

WAAY-TV reports the city zoning board approved the relocation of the Alabama Women's Center for Reproductive Alternatives during a meeting Tuesday night. It's the state's only abortion clinic north of Birmingham.

Abortion opponents tried to block the move but lost. They now plan to file a lawsuit.

Julie Bennett / al.com

A federal judge says an Alabama law restricting abortion doctors is unconstitutional.

U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson ruled Monday that state lawmakers exceeded their authority when they passed a law last year requiring doctors at abortion clinics to have hospital admitting privileges.

Thompson issued an order temporarily blocking enforcement of the law.

Thompson's decision comes days after a federal appeals court blocked a similar law in Mississippi.

Planned Parenthood and others filed a lawsuit over the Alabama law last year.

Alabama Women's Center

Three of Alabama's five abortion clinics remain open after complying with a new state law that sets stricter building requirements.

The law was passed by the Legislature last year and it goes into effect Tuesday.

The Alabama Department of Public Health says clinics in Tuscaloosa, Montgomery and Mobile have worked to comply with the law's requirements for wider halls and doors and improved fire safety measures. A clinic in Huntsville closed Friday because it couldn't meet the requirements. But it is planning to move to a new location and get a new license.

Alabama Women's Center

The only abortion clinic in north Alabama is expected to close by the end of the week.

Officials at the Alabama Women's Center said Tuesday that they'd rather close voluntarily than be faced with a state intervention.

The clinic was faced with a July 1 deadline to bring its facility up to code with a surgical treatment center.

Getty Images

A federal judge is scheduled to hear closing arguments in a trial over a new Alabama law requiring doctors at abortion clinic to have approval to admit patients to nearby hospitals.

Clinic operators in Mobile, Montgomery and Birmingham say they use traveling doctors who can't get admitting privileges, and they will have to stop performing abortions if a federal judge allows the law to take effect. The state attorney general's office says enforcement of the law will make abortions safer.

Getty Images

The owner of a Montgomery abortion clinic says she's never had a Montgomery-based physician performing abortions at the clinic during her 36 years at the facility and she has always used out-of-town doctors.

Julie Bennett / al.com

A federal court trial begins Monday over an Alabama abortion law that proponents say will make abortions safer and opponents say will close three of Alabama's five licensed abortion clinics.

The trial in Montgomery stems from a 2013 law that requires doctors at abortion clinics to have approval to admit patients to nearby hospitals. The clinics in Mobile, Montgomery and Birmingham say they will have to close because they use traveling doctors who can't sec8ure such admitting privileges.

Pages