Alabama schools

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The state school superintendent says all Alabama schools will reopen for traditional classes this fall. But they’ll also offer options for virtual learning for parents who aren’t comfortable sending their children back because of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Superintendent Eric Mackey announced plans for restarting the educational system during a news conference Friday. But he says the road map was subject to change based on the spread of the virus.

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama's top official for K-12 schools says public schools closed because of the coronavirus could bring some students back in June as part of a phased reopening. 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey has directed public schools to finish the year academic year through distance learning as the state tries to slow the spread of coronavirus. 

Alabama Superintendent of Education Eric Mackey said Thursday that the state is developing plans for how the distance learning would work. The governor said schools will use alternate instruction such as online lessons or take-home packets.

yoga in schools
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MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama lawmakers might lift a decades old ban on yoga in public schools, though the bill would keep the greeting “namaste” on the forbidden list.

A bill by Rep. Jeremy Gray of Opelika would let local school systems decide if they want to teach yoga, poses and stretches. However it would require the moves to have exclusively English names.

It would also prohibit the use of chanting, mantras and saying the greeting “namaste.” 

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MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — An audit of a school district in Alabama shows administrators misused over $700,000.

News outlets report the funds were used by six current and former Montgomery Public Schools employees on items such as alcohol, payments to a strip club and scholarships for an administrator's children.

The money went missing or was misused between October 2017 and September 2018. Many of the administrators no longer work for the district. At least one has repaid his misused funds.

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DOTHAN, Ala. (AP) — A public school system in Alabama has delayed classes a second time because of continuing problems from a computer malware attack.

Houston County school officials say students now won't return to class until Aug. 12. That's 11 days behind the original schedule and a week later than the first delay.

Education officials won't say what type of attack hit the southeast Alabama school system. But phones and computers aren't working properly.

The Alabama Department of Education released report cards yesterday assigning letter grades to every school and school system in the state for their performance.

A dozen of Alabama’s 137 school systems received an A. 52 received a B and 54 received a C. The remaining 19 got a D, and no school systems were deemed failing. The grades are based on the latest test scores as well as the rate of student improvement in reading and math from one year to the next.

BoE Meeting Could Mean Sentance Dismissal

Aug 25, 2017

The Alabama Board of Education could vote as soon as next month on whether to dismiss state Superintendent Michael Sentance.

Board member Jeff Newman tells the Associated Press several of the board’s members want to discuss Sentance’s contract at next month’s meeting. Newman says that could include a vote on whether to dismiss Sentance, the school reformer they hired just a year ago to lead Alabama’s public schools.

The board recently gave Sentance low marks on a performance evaluation. Sentance responded that he is proud of his work and hopes to continue in the role.

Thousands of Alabama children are attending private schools thanks to Accountability Act scholarships, but very few of those students transferred out of a failing public school.

The state program provides private school scholarships to help low-income students attend private schools. When lawmakers started the program in 2013, it was touted as a way to help students escape schools with chronically low test scores.

The Decatur Daily reports that, according to state data over the past three years, only 39 students withdrew from failing schools to attend private schools.

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Nearly 30 Alabama school systems are participating in a program to provide free breakfasts and lunches to all their students.

The Gadsden Times reports the program is meant to eliminate so-called "food deserts" where children aren't getting food.

The coordinator of Alabama's Child Nutrition Program, June Barrett, says about 28 school systems are participating and more can join later.

The federal program is available to districts or schools have at least 40 percent of students on free lunches. Entire districts or individual schools can participate.

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Several Alabama school systems will be offering breakfast and lunch free to all students when classes resume in August.

The state Department of Education says school systems qualifying for the free meals under the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act have poverty levels that are 40 percent and higher.

Systems that have all or nearly all of their schools participating in the program are Montgomery County, Barbour County, Clarke County, Lowndes County, Wilcox County, Selma, Tarrant, Midfield, Chickasaw, Albertville, Dallas County, Macon County, Linden, Bessemer and Anniston.

http://firstladydiannebentley.blogspot.com

This is the one day each year where crazy antics and colorful costumes are encouraged at the state Capitol.

   Gov. Robert Bentley is being joined Friday by mascots from Alabama's public universities to promote the upcoming College Colors Day. The annual promotional event will take place on the Capitol's south lawn at 3:30 p.m. It always includes the mascots trying out humorous moves that they will use at upcoming football games.

jimcarns.com

The Alabama House passed a bill Tuesday night saying no public or private schools has to accept a student transferring from a failing public school under the new Alabama Accountability Act.

The bill by Republican Rep. Jim Carns of Mountain Brook passed 62-40 and now goes to the Senate. Proponents said the bill keeps some systems from being overrun with transfers they can't afford. Opponents said it gives affluent suburban school systems a reason to reject transfers from inner-city schools.