Arts & Life

Emmys 2018 Winners: The Complete List

Sep 17, 2018

Updated at 10:59 p.m. ET

The 2018 Primetime Emmy Awards were broadcast Monday night on NBC. Below is the list of winners. (Winners are in bold italics.)


Outstanding drama series

The Americans (FX)

The Crown (Netflix)

Game of Thrones (HBO)

The Handmaid's Tale (Hulu)

Stranger Things (Netflix)

This Is Us (NBC)

Westworld (HBO)

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

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Sep 15, 2018

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CaseyFay (Casey Robbins) [Flickr]

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Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

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