Bloody Sunday

John Lewis funeral
Associated Press

 

 

SELMA, Ala. (AP) — The late U.S. Rep. John Lewis has crossed Selma’s Edmund Pettus Bridge for the final time as remembrances continue for the civil rights icon. 

A processional with Lewis’ casket was carried across the bridge Sunday where he and other civil rights marchers were beaten 55 years ago on “Bloody Sunday,” a key event in the fight for voting rights for African Americans.

 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Calls are growing nationally to honor the late Rep. John Lewis by putting his name on the Alabama bridge where he and other voting rights demonstrators were beaten 55 years ago. 

But the idea is being met with resistance in Selma, Alabama, the city where “Bloody Sunday” occurred.

Wikimedia Commons

 

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Religious faith was a lifelong constant for Rep. John Lewis. 

He spent his boyhood in Alabama preaching to a make-believe congregation of chickens and siblings. He went on to be inspired by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and to learn nonviolence protests tactics from ministers and other teachers.

 

SELMA, Ala. (AP) — On the day that became known as Bloody Sunday, John Lewis and a line of nonviolent marchers were beaten and tear-gassed by Alabama state troopers in Selma. 

The state-sanctioned violence at the Edmund Pettus Bridge stunned the nation and helped spur the passage of the federal Voting Rights Act. It also propelled Lewis on to a global stage as a hero of the U.S. civil rights movement.

Updated at 7 a.m. ET Saturday

John Lewis — an icon of the civil rights movement, congressman and, for decades, a force in Democratic politics — died at age 80 on Friday.

Lewis had been treated for advanced-stage pancreatic cancer after being diagnosed during a routine medical exam. He publicly disclosed his diagnosis in late December.

 

SELMA, Ala. (AP) — Residents in the landmark civil rights city of Selma, Alabama, are among the critics of a bid to rename the historic bridge where voting rights marchers were beaten in 1965.

Online petitions have circulated for years to rename the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma for Congressman John Lewis. Pettus was a white supremacist, and Lewis was beaten on the bridge 55 years ago.

Associated Press

MARION, Ala. (AP) — As the 55th anniversary of the civil rights clash known as Bloody Sunday approaches, townspeople in Alabama want to remind the world that the road to Selma began in a place called Marion.

In 1965, in what has become a footnote to history, a young black man by the name of Jimmie Lee Jackson was fatally shot at a protest in Marion. It was that killing that sent hundreds of people to Selma for a march at the Edmund Pettus Bridge two weeks later.

nationalparks.org

SELMA, Ala. (AP) — Democratic presidential hopefuls are coming to Selma on Sunday as part of their final push before Super Tuesday.

Former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, former South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg and Tom Steyer  are scheduled to visit Selma.

The candidates are attending the 55th anniversary of "Bloody Sunday" the infamous 1965 march in which civil rights demonstrators were beaten on the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

 

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Cory Booker is delivering the keynote address at a Selma church during the annual commemoration of the "Bloody Sunday" civil rights march.

Booker will speak at the Brown Chapel AME Church in Selma on March 3. His campaign announced the appearance Friday.

Booker is one of several Democrats attending the event which often draws national political figures.

Jackson House
Alex AuBuchon / APR

Wednesday, April 4 marks the fiftieth anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Junior’s assassination. For the past month, the Alabama Public Radio news team has been examining Dr. King’s work and his impact here in Alabama. You’ve heard a photographer from Montgomery recall documenting King’s work. APR guest reporter Ousmane Sagara shared how people in his nation of Mali remember Dr. King. You also heard about the house where King hid from white supremacists, just days before his assassination. Now APR’s Alex AuBuchon reports on another place in Alabama closely connected to Dr. King, and how his influence is being felt by a new generation…

Organizers of the Bridge Crossing Jubilee in Selma say they plan to move forward with the event, despite the city of Selma asking for $23,000 to provide police, fire, and other city services for the gathering.

Organizer and civil rights activist Faya Rose Touré says "everything is a go" for the march and celebration, which coincides with the anniversary of the 1965 "Bloody Sunday" march. Demonstrators were beaten on Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma during that famous march.

Touré says they will not pay the $23,000 requested by Selma's city hall.

The lone Democrat and black person in Alabama's congressional delegation says she is skipping the inauguration of president-elect Donald Trump.  

Representative Terri Sewell of Selma tweeted Wednesday that she can't accept the disrespect shown to Representative John Lewis of Georgia, a civil rights veteran who grew up in Alabama.

Trump criticized Lewis after the congressman questioned the legitimacy of the election and said he isn't attending the inaugural. Dozens of other congressional Democrats have since said they won't go, either.

A new study at the University of Alabama is looking to study parents of children who have cancer.

The research is being conducted by the College of Human Environmental Sciences to see how parents of a child with cancer react while the child is going through treatment.

Dr. Sherwood Burns-Nader is heading up the study. She feels this survey can help future parents cope better with the process.

Selma will honor its history as a center for voting rights activism this weekend. The annual Bridge Crossing Jubilee marks the fifty-first anniversary of Bloody Sunday.

Officials expect crowds will be down from the numbers that visited for the fiftieth anniversary and to see President Barack Obama speak. The weekend will include an education summit tomorrow, a hip-hop summit on Saturday, and the bridge crossing on Sunday at the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

Alabama lawmakers are quickly moving to block a minimum wage hike that has already been approved in Birmingham.

The Alabama Senate could vote today to give final passage to a bill stripping cities of the ability to set their own minimum wages.

Republican Rep. David Faulkner of Mountain Brook says his bill will maintain uniformity across the state. Faulkner says it would be an undue burden on businesses to allow hundreds of different minimum wages across Alabama.

Parts of the Gulf Coast are reeling after a bout of severe weather that caused Governor Robert Bentley to declare a preemptive state of emergency.

A storm reportedly knocked down trees and damaged property in Reform, Alabama, but no one was hurt. The National Weather Service tweeted that radar indicated a possible tornado in that area.

NWS radar also showed a tornado briefly touching down in Hackleburg, in northwest Alabama. Some roofs were damaged, but no injuries were reported.

Blue Bell is beginning a trial run of ice cream production at its Sylacauga plant after a national recall due to a series of listeria illnesses.

Alabama Health Officer Don Williamson said yesterday that Blue Bell notified his department that it will begin a trial run of production later this month. The ice cream will not be sold to consumers. Williamson says both state health officials and Blue Bell will test the product for listeria.

A judge recently stopped another effort from Alabama House Speaker Mike Hubbard’s defense to have his ethics case dismissed.

Lee County Judge Jacob Walker III granted a state motion to kill subpoenas against Governor Robert Bentley and the custodian of records for the Alabama Ethics Commission.

Hubbard’s lawyers say those subpoenas were necessary to learn about possible communication records from Governor Bentley regarding Attorney General Luther Strange recusing himself from the case and appointing chief prosecutor Van Davis.

www.lbjlibrary.org

  The daughters of Dr. Martin Luther King Junior and Governor George Wallace will meet with Governor Robert Bentley today. It’s all part of a ceremony to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the Selma to Montgomery voting rights march.    It was on this date in 1965 that Dr. King led the procession to Alabama’s State Capitol. APR spoke with Bernice** King during the remembrance of “bloody Sunday” in Selma.

She says voting rights are being challenged in the U.S. and the fight has to go on.

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange is asking U.S. District Judge Callie Granade to keep gay marriage in the state on hold.

Strange filed a motion yesterday asking Granade to delay any more gay marriage decisions until the U.S. Supreme Court rules later this year.

reputationdoctor.com

Even though it is Monday today marks the 50th anniversary of Turnaround Tuesday. On this day fifty years ago Martin Luther King Junior led marchers halfway across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma.           

The City of Selma remembered the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday” over the weekend. But today marks another milestone in the civil rights movement.

Saturday was the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday” in 1965. Today marks 50 years since the second march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge called Turnaround Tuesday. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., led that protest himself, but turned back before state troopers could attack like they did just two days prior.

Selma city councilman Benny Lee Tucker was a teenager in 1965. He says he had a specific job during King’s march…

photoblog.nbcnews.com

Vice President Joe Biden says the same human rights that African Americans fought for in Selma, Alabama, are at stake for gay rights activists today.

Biden is drawing parallels between the civil rights and gay rights movements in a speech to the Human Rights Campaign, a gay rights group.

He says Selma and Stonewall were "basically the same movement." He's referring to 1969 Stonewall Inn riots that marked the symbolic start of the modern gay rights movement.

An Eye Witness to History: An Interview with Vera Jenkins Booker

Mar 5, 2015

This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, when civil rights marchers were set upon by Alabama state police troopers and a sheriff’s posse as they tried to march from Selma to Montgomery. The catalyst for these marches was the shooting death and funeral of activist Jimmie Lee Jackson. I sat down and had a conversation with Vera Jenkins Booker, the nurse who tended to Jackson the night he was brought in the Good Samaritan Hospital in Selma fifty years ago…

Stan Ingold

This weekend, the city of Selma will remember the fiftieth anniversary of the event known as Bloody Sunday. State troopers attacked voting rights marchers with clubs and tear gas in 1965. The Edmund Pettus Bridge, where the bloodshed took place, has become a monument to the civil rights movement. For one Atlanta couple, the bridge is a symbol of something else, and that’s raising some eyebrows in Selma.

www.clipartbest.com

The Alabama Supreme Court has upheld a state program that gives tax credits to help families pay for private school.

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that the law does not violate restrictions on giving funds to private, religious schools because the money goes to parents.

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange says in a news release this afternoon “The Supreme Court’s ruling makes it crystal clear that Alabama parents have the right to school choice in seeking the best education for their children.”

The city of Selma is preparing to remember the fiftieth anniversary of the attack known as "Bloody Sunday".

Today also marks fifty years since the funeral of civil rights activist Jimmie Lee Jackson. His death at the hands of an Alabama State Police Trooper is considered one of the reasons Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. came to Selma to help organize the voting rights marches.

Vera Jenkins Booker was the nurse that tended to Jackson when he was brought in to the Good Samaritan Hospital in Selma.

The world is getting ready to remember the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday in Selma early next month. But another bit of Selma history is being remembered now.

100 years before the voting rights march and Bloody Sunday, the Battle of Selma took place during the Civil War. A historic marker was just unveiled at the corner of Highland and Summerfield Road.

In April of 1965, Union general James H. Wilson defeated the troops under Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest. Wilson’s biographer, Edward Longacre, says Wilson was only 27 at the time.

www.awesomestories.com

The world is getting ready to remember the fiftieth anniversary of Bloody Sunday in Selma early next month. But another bit of Selma history is being remembered now.

It’s tax season and university students across the state are rolling up their sleeves to help taxpayers manage all the paperwork.

The group Impact Alabama has opened help centers to assist families with children who earn fifty two thousand dollars a year or less. Families without children to make less than twenty thousand dollars also qualify for assistance.

Sarah Louise Smith is the Executive Director of Impact Alabama. She says families get tax tips and the student volunteers gain experience working with customers.

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