Civil War

Mobile Under Siege: Surviving the Union Blockade
Amazon.com

Mobile Under Siege: Surviving the Union Blockade

Author: Paula Lenor Webb

Publisher: History Press

Pages: 142

Price: $ 21.99 (Paper)

When I commenced reading “Mobile Under Siege,” I believed it would be the story of the Port City during most of the Civil War, under Union naval blockade, with plucky blockade runners dashing out in the fog with contraband cotton bound for the mills of England by way of Havana, Cuba, and dashing in with a fresh load of fine wine and cigars.

It is not.

Space Matters map
Alex AuBuchon / APR

Last night, students, historians and others gathered at the oldest structure on the University of Alabama’s campus for the unveiling of a new kind of historical exhibit.

“Space Matters” is an interactive exhibit inside the Gorgas House Museum. It uses animated maps, videos and music to tell the nuanced stories of three historical figures from Tuscaloosa's history before and during the Civil War.

“The Million-Dollar Man Who Helped Kill a President”

Author: Christopher Lyle McIlwain, Sr.  

Publisher: Savis Beatie

Pages: 266

Price: $32.95

Chris McIlwain has been practicing law in Tuscaloosa for over thirty years—in the daytime—and researching nineteenth-century Alabama history evenings and weekends.

Steve Flowers on the Free State

Sep 25, 2018

If you're a fan of actor Matthew McConaughey, you may have seen his movie "Free State of Jones." It's about a county in Mississippi that rose up against the Confederacy during the Civil War. That's drawing a reaction of "been there, done that" from APR political commentator Steve Flowers.

Today, Steve has the story of a like-minded Alabama county and one of its favorite sons who became a hero of the Civil Rights movement...

Civil War Alabama

Author: Christopher Lyle McIlwain Sr.   

Foreword by G. Ward Hobbs

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

Pages: 435

Price: $59.95 (Hardcover)

Tuscaloosa attorney Chris McIlwain, for 25 years, has been practicing law all day and in the evenings and weekends researching the Civil War in Alabama. He read journals and diaries, the military records and, most especially, the many, many newspapers published all over Alabama during the conflict.

The result of this Herculean effort is, so far, three books.

An organization that preserves Civil War battlefields is looking for volunteers to help clean up historical sites across Alabama.

The Civil War Trust says volunteers will be working at more than 160 sites nationwide during its annual cleanup day on April 7.

In Alabama, Fort Morgan is on the list of places slated for work. The red-brick fort located at the tip of the Fort Morgan Peninsula played a key role in the Battle of Mobile Bay in 1864.

“1865 Alabama: From Civil War to Uncivil Peace”

Author: Christopher Lyle McIlwain, Sr.   

Publisher: University of Alabama Press  

Pages: 276

Price: $59.95 (Cloth)

Christopher McIlwain, a practicing Tuscaloosa attorney, has been researching Alabama in the Civil War for over 25 years.

He has gone deeply into such primary sources as letters, diaries, drafts of legislation before the Alabama legislature and, especially, the editorial pages of the many Alabama newspapers during the years 1861-1865.

“These Rugged Days: Alabama in the Civil War”

Author: John S. Sledge   

Publisher: The University of Alabama Press

Pages: 296

Price: $34.95 (Cloth)

There is surely no subject more written about than the American Civil War, so it is perfectly sensible to ask whether this book is needed. The answer is an unequivocal yes, and I learned a lot.

Associated Press

As cities across the country are tearing down and relocating Confederate monuments, a county in southern Alabama on Sunday unveiled a new one.

Several hundred people attended a dedication ceremony for the "Unknown

 Alabama Confederate Soldiers" at Confederate Veterans Memorial Park in Crenshaw County, Alabama, 55 miles south of Montgomery.

The memorial park's owner and developer, David Coggins, says the groups in attendance weren't white nationalists or racists, but were acknowledging their heritage and honoring Confederate soldiers everywhere.

A conference committee will decide what to do with an Alabama bill that would prevent Confederate monuments from being taken down. 

The group of will try to resolve House and Senate differences in the bill that would prohibit the removal of any historic marker or monument.

The House of Representatives on Thursday appointed conference committee members so the panel can meet in the final week of the legislative session.

The bill comes as some Southern cities consider taking down Confederate monuments.

Steve Flowers on Goat Hill Sayings

Feb 21, 2017

Some of ya'll might wonder why Alabama is called the "Heart of Dixie?" Well, we call it the Heart of Dixie because of bank notes issued by the Citizens Bank of Louisiana before the Civil War...

A committee probing the possible impeachment of Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley is hiring special counsel to lead the investigation.  The House Judiciary Committee will meet Friday to discuss and approve the appointment.

The committee is looking into whether there are grounds to impeach the Republican governor in the wake of a sex-tinged scandal involving a former top aide.

Ryan Vasquez

Staff Sergeant Ryan Pitts is the most recent recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor. The honor is awarded to military personnel for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty. Pitt joins an exclusive fraternity. Just over three thousand soldiers out of the millions of U.S. servicemen and women are awarded the Medal of Honor. It also connects soldiers today to some of the first recipients of the award following the Battle of Mobile Bay.

U.S. Postal Service

Alabama Public Radio has been looking back at key events of the War Between the States in and around Alabama. Today marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Mobile Bay. Over the past week, there have been reenactments, news stories and even a stamp dedication by the U.S. Postal Service.

Morgan County Archives

This week marks one hundred and fifty years since the Battle of Mobile Bay. For the past week, the Alabama Public Radio newsroom has been looking back on the battle and at Alabama’s role in the war in 1864. Union forces wanted Mobile Bay because it was a sea port. They wanted the city of Decatur for a similar reason. It may not seem like it today, but 150 years ago Decatur, Alabama was a significant crossroads for commerce in the south. In the days before the Tennessee Valley Authority tamed the Tennessee River, Muscle Shoals was an impassable series of rapids.

            All week long Alabama Public Radio is taking a look back at events during the War Between the States. One hundred fifty years ago plans were underway for federal forces to attack and capture Mobile Bay from the Confederacy. We remember the ensuing battle with someone with a unique vantage point…

“As far as my friends and people really knowing this information, very few of them do.”

Stan Ingold

Alabama Public radio is looking back on a pivotal moment in the American Civil War. Next week marks one hundred and fifty years since the battle of Mobile Bay, which was a turning point the War Between the States. APR is also looking at Alabama’s role in the Civil War in 1864. Many people talk about the battles, but some of those who fought were captured and held in POW camps. The Confederate Camp Andersonville often comes to mind. There was also a camp here in Alabama.

civilwar.org

Civil War re-enactors from across the nation will be on the Alabama coast this weekend to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Mobile Bay and the Siege of Fort Morgan.

Organizers say the activities will begin Friday evening with a concert of Civil War music by Bobby Horton. The re-enactment begins Saturday morning with the attack of the Union Navy. The re-enactment continues all day and concludes Saturday night with a barrage of artillery firing over the effort. The re-enactment continues Sunday with the surrender of Fort Morgan.

Stan Ingold

    

  It's an historic day in the annals of submarine warfare.

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the attack by the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley on the Union blockade ship Housatonic, which sank off Charleston during the Civil War. Although the Hunley never returned, it became the first submarine to sink an enemy warship. Take a look below at APR’s feature report on the history of the ill-fated submarine…