Jimmie Lee Jackson

An Eye Witness to History: An Interview with Vera Jenkins Booker

Mar 5, 2015

This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, when civil rights marchers were set upon by Alabama state police troopers and a sheriff’s posse as they tried to march from Selma to Montgomery. The catalyst for these marches was the shooting death and funeral of activist Jimmie Lee Jackson. I sat down and had a conversation with Vera Jenkins Booker, the nurse who tended to Jackson the night he was brought in the Good Samaritan Hospital in Selma fifty years ago…

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The Alabama Supreme Court has upheld a state program that gives tax credits to help families pay for private school.

The Supreme Court ruled Monday that the law does not violate restrictions on giving funds to private, religious schools because the money goes to parents.

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange says in a news release this afternoon “The Supreme Court’s ruling makes it crystal clear that Alabama parents have the right to school choice in seeking the best education for their children.”

The city of Selma is preparing to remember the fiftieth anniversary of the attack known as "Bloody Sunday".

Today also marks fifty years since the funeral of civil rights activist Jimmie Lee Jackson. His death at the hands of an Alabama State Police Trooper is considered one of the reasons Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. came to Selma to help organize the voting rights marches.

Vera Jenkins Booker was the nurse that tended to Jackson when he was brought in to the Good Samaritan Hospital in Selma.

The world is getting ready to remember the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday in Selma early next month. But another bit of Selma history is being remembered now.

100 years before the voting rights march and Bloody Sunday, the Battle of Selma took place during the Civil War. A historic marker was just unveiled at the corner of Highland and Summerfield Road.

In April of 1965, Union general James H. Wilson defeated the troops under Confederate general Nathan Bedford Forrest. Wilson’s biographer, Edward Longacre, says Wilson was only 27 at the time.

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The world is getting ready to remember the fiftieth anniversary of Bloody Sunday in Selma early next month. But another bit of Selma history is being remembered now.