spring break

ORANGE BEACH, Ala. (AP) — City leaders in Alabama beach towns are vowing to crack down on drunken and disorderly beach-goers.

Gulf Shores and Orange Beach have long sought to bill themselves as family friendly spring break destinations, Al.com reported.

In Orange Beach, Mayor Tony Kinnon warns that people who visit his town for spring break must behave or "you're going to jail."

Fewer Spring Break Arrests This Year

Mar 24, 2017

Police in Alabama's two largest beach towns say they've made more than 450 spring break-related arrests so far this year, and that's a big improvement from last year.

Police in both Orange Beach and Gulf Shores are implementing some new tough policies this year to keep young vacationers under control. They say the change has resulted in far fewer problems.

Orange Beach police tell WALA-TV they made 287 arrests so far this spring, which is significantly fewer than last year when more than 750 were arrested.

Gulf Shores Votes to Keep Alcohol Ban

Nov 29, 2016

The public beaches in Gulf Shores, Alabama will be alcohol-free once again next year for Spring Break.

The Gulf Shores City Council voted unanimously last night to reinstate a ban on alcohol on the city’s beaches from March 4 through April 16 of next year. The ban applies to everyone, and no alcohol will be allowed to be possessed or consumed on the beaches during that time period.

Gulf Shores To Vote on Reinstating Alcohol Ban

Nov 28, 2016

The town of Gulf Shores is looking at continuing its ban of alcohol on its beaches during spring break season for next year.

Some worry that the ban will affect local businesses and restaurants that are dependent on alcohol sales. Mayor Robert Craft explains that the decision to vote on the ban will also affect the city by decreasing the tax revenue during that time period. However, he says the city's decision is backed by confidence from broad community support to remain a family-friendly vacation area.

justice.gov

Alabama Governor Robert Bentley is facing another hurdle this week.

State Auditor Jim Zeigler has filed an ethics complaint against Bentley and Bentley’s senior political advisor Rebekah Caldwell Mason.  A-L-dot-com reports Zeigler’s complaint is the about the possible misuse of state property by the Governor, and whether Mason should be considered a public official or a lobbyist.

Governor Robert Bentley’s plan to construct four new prisons is moving on through the state legislature, but not without a few red flags. APR’s MacKenzie Bates explains.

The Senate Budget Committee sent Governor’s Bentley’s prison building plan to the full Senate. The committee approved the bill yesterday in wake of two violent uprisings at a South Alabama prison. Governor Bentley blames the incidents on overcrowding.

Senator Cam Ward says those situations show that the state desperately needs new prisons.

Alabama's attorney general is appealing a recent ruling that declared the state's death penalty sentencing system unconstitutional.

Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange says Jefferson County Circuit Court Judge Tracie Todd doesn't have the authority to prevent the state from seeking the death penalty against defendants who are charged with capital murder.

In Alabama death penalty cases, juries recommend sentences but judges have the final say. It’s not uncommon for state judges to overturn a jury recommendation of life in prison in favor of the death penalty.

Gov. Robert Bentley is hinting that lawmakers could be back in special session if they fail to pass a budget that he feels adequately funds Medicaid.

Bentley says he would veto any budget without an additional $100 million for Medicaid. While lawmakers could override his veto, Bentley says that did not preclude a special session.

Commissioner Stephanie Azar says Medicaid needs that amount to avoid cuts and continue a switch to managed care.

A new study at the University of Alabama is looking to study parents of children who have cancer.

The research is being conducted by the College of Human Environmental Sciences to see how parents of a child with cancer react while the child is going through treatment.

Dr. Sherwood Burns-Nader is heading up the study. She feels this survey can help future parents cope better with the process.