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Mobile makes plans for post-COVID Mardi Gras and Moon Pie Drop

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It looks like a New Year’s Eve tradition is coming back for Mobile. Plans are underway for the Moon Pie drop to ring in 2022.

COVID-19 cancelled two of Mobile’s biggest celebrations: the New Year’s Eve Moon Pie event in 2020 and Mardi Gras in 2021. But organizers say both are coming back bigger and better this year. Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue was just named as the headliner for the MoonPie Over Mobile.

Judi Gulledge is the executive director of the Mobile Carnival Museum calls it the event the unofficial start of Mardi Gras.

“We missed our New Year's Eve celebration last year, and we missed our Mardi Gras celebration,” Gulledge said. “MoonPie Over Mobile is our New Year's Eve celebration with dropping the world's largest electric MoonPie. Once we finish our New Year's then we're moving into our Mardi Gras season. It’s a perfect way to usher in the new Mardi Gras season.”

Organizers say things will be different as Mobile rings in 2022, but not in 2022. Former city councilman Fred Richardson will be the honorary chairman of the event. He helped start the Moon Pie Drop in 2008. Richardson got the honor of announcing the musical headliners for the event.

“I arrived to announce to you today that to ring in 2022, we are bringing in the funk with Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue to electrify you,” Richardson told a crowd in the port city.

COVID-19 cancelled parades and balls last year all along the Gulf coast. Mobile lays claim to starting the organized Mardi Gras tradition in 1703. The Fat Tuesday celebration reportedly didn’t catch on in New Orleans until the 1830’s.

Lynn Oldshue is a reporter for Alabama Public Radio.
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