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Congressman Steals Pope Francis' Water, Brags About It

In his congressional office, Rep. Bob Brady, D-Pa., drinks from the glass of water Pope Francis used during his speech to Congress.
Stan White
/
U.S. Rep. Bob Brady's office via AP
In his congressional office, Rep. Bob Brady, D-Pa., drinks from the glass of water Pope Francis used during his speech to Congress.

Some people do drink holy water, hoping for a little extra help from above.

But no one steals the pope's.

That is, no one, except Rep. Bob Brady. The Pennsylvania Democrat, a Roman Catholic, apparently eyed the glass atop the lectern next to Pope Francis during his address to Congress. Once Francis was done, Brady nabbed it, sneaked it back to his office — and drank it.

"How many people do you know that drank out of the same glass as the pope?" Brady said, per the Philadelphia Daily News.

This is not the first time Brady has pulled off this kind of heist. He did the same thing after President Obama's first inaugural address.

Brady may have broken at least two of the 10 commandments — Nos. 8 and 10. Per Exodus 20:1-17:

"You shall not steal."

And:

"You shall not covet ... anything that is your neighbor's."


Any good Catholic might feel a measure of guilt for pulling this off. If the Philadelphia congressman does wind up feeling pangs of guilt — and there's no indication he does — the pope happens to be in town.

Maybe he would take Brady's confession. After all, Francis has declared this the year of mercy.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Domenico Montanaro is NPR's senior political editor/correspondent. Based in Washington, D.C., his work appears on air and online delivering analysis of the political climate in Washington and campaigns. He also helps edit political coverage.
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