dementia

Vernon Madison
EJI

ATMORE, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama inmate spared from execution by questions over whether dementia had erased memories of his crime has died on death row.

The Alabama Department of Corrections said in a statement Monday that Vernon Madison died over the weekend. He was 69.

The agency said no foul play is suspected.

Madison spent more than three decades on Alabama's death row for killing a police officer in 1985. His last scheduled execution was halted in 2018 after Madison's attorneys argued that strokes had left him with severe dementia and no memory of the murder.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is ordering a new state court hearing to determine whether an Alabama death row inmate is so affected by dementia that he can't be executed.

The justices ruled 5-3 on Wednesday in favor of inmate Vernon Madison, who killed a police officer in 1985. His lawyers say he has suffered strokes that have left him with severe dementia.

Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court's four liberals in siding with Madison.

Virginia Wadley Bradley
UAB

A new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham could help patients ward off dementia.

UAB School of Medicine researchers took part in a project examining what the benefits would be if a patient dramatically lowered his or her blood pressure. The so-called SPRINT MIND trial examined whether a lower blood pressure reading would also reduce the risk of cognitive impairment or dementia.

Researchers found that reducing systolic pressure below 120 did reduce that risk. The systolic reading is the first of two numbers when you get your blood pressure taken.