Fred Gray

 

The rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine is going slowly in Tuskegee because of the city's painful history with medicine.

For 40 years the government used Black men in the city as test subjects when studying syphilis.

Mayor seeks to name street for famed civil rights lawyer

Dec 3, 2020

Civil rights attorney Fred Gray might become the new namesake of a street in Montgomery.

Mayor Steven Reed wants to change the name of West Jeff Davis Avenue to Fred D. Gray Avenue to honor the man who represented Rosa Parks and was legal adviser to Martin Luther King Jr. 

Gray won multiple court victories throughout the Civil Rights Era.

 

ATHENS, Ala. (AP) — The Alabama NAACP says it's honoring four people as the initial members of the Alabama NAACP Hall of Honor. 

The list includes attorney Fred Gray Sr. of Tuskegee, who once fought for the right of the organization to operate in the state. Other honorees include Della M. Bryant of Montgomery; Frank Travis of Limestone County; and Mary Walker of Mobile.

MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Alabama State University students who were expelled for leading the state's first known sit-in protest against segregation have been honored on the 59th anniversary of the protest.

Montgomery city and county leaders Monday presented resolutions to ASU President Quinton Ross expressing sorrow for the "wrongs from the past."

The students from the historically black university staged a sit-in on Feb. 25, 1960, at the whites-only lunch counter at the Montgomery County Courthouse.

Stan Ingold / Alabama Public Radio

All year long at Alabama Public Radio, we’ve been looking at rural health. Many of the challenges residents of these communities face are a lack of doctors and hospitals, and the money to pay for care. For many African-Americans in Alabama, a lack of trust of outsiders and the government. This issue can be traced back to a study conducted by the U.S. government on black men living around Tuskegee. This year marks a twenty year milestone in a federal study of syphilis which still resonates across the country.

Tomorrow marks 20 years since President Bill Clinton formally apologized on behalf of the U.S. government for the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment.

The purpose of this study was to observe the natural progression of untreated syphilis in rural African-American men in Alabama. The study began in 1932 and lasted until 1972, after a whistleblower exposed information about the research to the press and prompted the government to shut down the program.

Jurors hearing the federal retrial of former Madison police officer Eric Parker will be back in court today for a fourth day of deliberations.

Jurors will return to court this morning after telling U.S. District Judge Madeline Haikala they were once again unable to come to a unanimous decision in the civil rights case.

The judge is trying to avoid a second mistrial for Parker on charges of violating the rights of 58-year-old Sureshbhai Patel by using excessive force during a police stop in February. Parker's first trial ended in a hung jury.

Prison Reform Task Force, Fred Gray speech and ACREcon

Jan 30, 2015

The Alabama Prison Reform Task Force is currently considering a slate of recommendations from the Council of State Governments to address Alabama's poorly performing prisons.

Some of their suggestions include hiring more probation officers and creating a new, lesser felony class for low-level offenses.

The Task Force estimates that proposed changes should reduce Alabama's prison population from 200% capacity down to 162% by 2021.