Associated Press

The Associated Press is one of the largest and most trusted sources of independent newsgathering, supplying a steady stream of news to its members, international subscribers and commercial customers. AP is neither privately owned nor government-funded; instead, it's a not-for-profit news cooperative owned by its American newspaper and broadcast members.

In the span of three hours at a southwest Alabama prison, one inmate was fatally stabbed and another was seriously wounded after being stabbed in a separate fight.

Eighteen inmates have been killed by other inmates since October of 2016, according to statistics and news releases from the state Department of Corrections.

A newly formed group at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama's capital city is aiming to improve the education options for military families stationed there.

The Montgomery Advertiser reports the group plans to tackle a variety of topics, including: Increasing attendance at the on-base school; streamlining the application process for Montgomery's magnet schools; and providing school choice options for military families.

Exploring the possibility of charter schools in the area is part of the discussion.

A man charged with attempted murder in a shooting at an Alabama shopping mall on Thanksgiving is asking for police video of the entire incident, which ended with police shooting and killing another man.

An attorney for 20-year-old Erron Martez Dequan Brown of Bessemer made the request in a court document filed late Tuesday. It comes as protesters and relatives of the man killed by police, 21-year-old Emantic "EJ" Bradford, Jr., continue asking to see any video of the confrontation.

Grantt Culliver
ADOC

A high-ranking Alabama prison official has retired in the midst of a misconduct investigation.

Alabama Department of Corrections spokesman Bob Horton says ADOC Associate Commissioner Grantt Culliver has retired after having been on leave for several months.

The department placed Culliver on leave in September pending the outcome of an investigation into misconduct allegations.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey and Attorney General Steve Marshall say they are dissatisfied with the parole board's improvement plan. They are asking the board to make additional changes and provide more information.

Ivey and Marshall intervened earlier this year after prosecutors and victim advocates expressed concerns over who was being released from prison and the number of people being paroled earlier than normal.

Gage Skidemore / wikipedia.org

Former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich is giving the keynote address at an annual gathering of Alabama farmers. 

The Alabama Farmers Federation is holding its 97th annual meeting Sunday and Monday in Montgomery.

Gingrich will address the group Monday night.

The Alabama Farmers Federation says that over 1,200 farmers and guests have registered for the meeting. It is one of the state's largest gatherings of farmers.

The organization on Sunday gave its service to agriculture award to Alabama Agriculture Commissioner John McMillan.

Alabama is marking its first Rosa Parks Day. Alabama lawmakers earlier 

this year voted to designate December first as a day to honor the civil rights icon.

Parks, an African-American woman, was arrested after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a segregated bus in Montgomery on Dececember first, 1955.

Her action ignited the yearlong Montgomery bus boycott and helped usher in the civil rights movement.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson delivered the eulogy for an African-American man shot to death by a police officer following a shooting at a crowded Alabama shopping mall.  

Funeral services were held for 21-year-old Emantic "EJ" Fitzgerald Bradford, Jr. on Saturday in Birmingham. 

A police officer in nearby Hoover shot and killed Bradford on Thanksgiving night while responding to a shooting at a crowded shopping mall.

Police later acknowledged he was not the gunman in the shooting that wounded two people.

redstone arsenal
wikipedia

Officials say the Federal Bureau of Investigation will bring hundreds of jobs to an Army base in north Alabama as part of an expansion that will include the agency's first large-scale operations support building.

The FBI announced the expansion Thursday at Redstone Arsenal just outside Huntsville. Robert Hamilton, FBI senior executive for Redstone, says the agency will move nearly 1,400 personnel and contractors from the Washington, D.C., region to the Huntsville area. The FBI currently has roughly 300 employees working on its two campuses at Redstone.

Some community activists are calling on leaders in Alabama's largest city to ban conversion therapy for minors.

Al.com reports the Affirming Birmingham Coalition wants Mayor Randall Woodfin to support a city ordinance to prohibit mental health professionals from trying to change a minor's sexual orientation or gender identity.

Some states and municipalities around the country have approved bans prohibiting state-licensed psychologists from using conversion therapy techniques. No such bans currently exist in Alabama.

A former Alabama sheriff has pleaded guilty to giving an inmate a gun and the keys needed to escape jail.

Al.com reports former Sumter County Sheriff Tyrone Clark also pleaded guilty Monday to promoting prison contraband, including allowing an inmate to run a drug operation from behind bars.

Seventeenth Circuit District Attorney Greg Griggers says his office dropped human trafficking and perjury charges against Clark in exchange for the guilty plea.

A lawsuit filed against former Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley by his one-time law enforcement secretary is currently set to go to trial next March.

Court records show Montgomery Circuit Judge Greg Griffin set a March 4 trial date for the case.

Former ALEA Secretary Spencer Collier contends Bentley wrongfully fired him and then tried to discredit him with a sham state investigation. Collier also accuses Bentley of interfering in law enforcement business.

Bentley argues Collier was dismissed "for cause."

Police say a man shot and killed by a police officer at an Alabama shopping mall Thursday night was "likely" not the person who shot a teenager that evening.

Twenty-one-year-old Emantic Fitzgerald Bradford of Hueytown, Ala. was shot and killed by a police officer responding to the Thanksgiving night shooting at Riverchase Galleria that wounded an 18-year-old and 12-year-old.

Alabama's state elections results will be certified next week.

Secretary of State John Merrill's office says the canvassing board will meet at 2 p.m. Tuesday in Montgomery.

Governor Kay Ivey, Attorney General Steve Marshall and Merrill will canvass and certify election results during the meeting.

None of the statewide races had narrow margins, as Republicans swept all statewide offices.

Edmund Pettus Bridge
Alex AuBuchon / APR

The treasurer of the city of Selma is suing to be reinstated to her position, even as city officials continue to wrangle with a budget crisis that sparked 68 layoffs.

Local news outlets report Selma Treasurer Ronita Wade sued Tuesday in Dallas County Circuit Court demanding reinstatement to her position. Wade had been placed on leave three times since 2017 by Selma Mayor Darrio Melton.

Melton says Wade is under investigation for criminal misconduct. Wade says she is unaware of any such investigation.

A new federal lawsuit is challenging Alabama's practice of suspending the driver's licenses of people who are unable to pay their traffic tickets.

The lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Montgomery says the practice violates the Fourteenth Amendment by "punishing persons simply because they are poor."

The Southern Poverty Law Center filed the lawsuit on behalf of three Alabama residents who had their licenses suspended. According to the lawsuit, nearly 23,000 Alabamians currently have suspended licenses because of their inability to pay traffic tickets.

Matt Hart, a prosecutor who led some of the state's highest-profile corruption probes, has suddenly left the Alabama attorney general's office.

Attorney General Steve Marshall accepted Hart's resignation on Monday and thanked him for his service, according to spokesman Mike Lewis. Lewis declined to comment further, including on whether Marshall asked for the resignation.

Hart led the special prosecutions division under then-Attorney General Luther Strange and remained in that position after Marshall took over the Attorney General's post.

The chief executive officer of the nation's largest public utility has announced his plans to retire.

Bill Johnson of the Tennessee Valley Authority revealed his plans during a board meeting Wednesday in Tupelo, Mississippi.

Johnson joined the federal utility in 2013. He turns 65 in January.

TVA says it could take months while the board searches through internal or external candidates. Johnson will remain CEO while his successor is picked and trained to lead.

Editor's Note: On correction from the AP below...

The man appointed by President Donald Trump's administration to run the Environmental Protection Agency's Southeastern regional office and who once was Alabama's top environmental official has been indicted, along with a former business partner, on state ethics charges in Alabama.

Bellefonte plant
Wikimedia.org

The businessman trying to buy a mothballed nuclear power plant from Tennessee Valley Authority has been given an extension to complete the $111 million purchase.

The Chattanooga Times Free Press reports Franklin Haney signed an agreement on Nov. 14, 2016, that gave the former real estate developer two years to complete the purchase of the unfinished Bellefonte Nuclear Power Plant in north Alabama.

TVA has now extended the deadline to Nov. 30.

wikipedia.org

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor was on hand in Mobile, Alabama, to christen a U.S. Navy ship.  

Al.com repoertsthat the USNS Puerto Rico was christened Saturday at the Austal USA shipyard, where it was built. Sotomayor broke a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow, a Navy tradition.

The Puerto Rico was the 11th of 12 Expeditionary Fast Transport ships to be built by Austal under a $1.9 billion contract.

Alabama's growing population means state driver licenses will get an additional digit.  

The Alabama Law Enforcement Agency says it's adding an eighth digit to all new driver licenses issued by the state beginning Dec. 1.

The department says people who hold the roughly 5.9 million valid licenses already issued by the state won't be affected by the change. Their seven-digit licenses will remain valid.

Alabama's largest health insurer will stop covering OxyContin prescriptions as part of an effort to deter opioid abuse.

AL.com reports Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Alabama announced earlier this week that it will stop covering the standard formulation of OxyContin and its generic variation, oxycodone ER, on January 1, 2019. The changes are part of the insurer's opioid management strategy for commercial members.

Nearly one in 10 voters in Alabama are currently characterized as inactive and will need to update their addresses in order for their votes to count in next week’s midterm elections.

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill says 301,914 voters are currently listed as inactive. He says those voters can still cast ballots on Tuesday, but they must fill out a form at their polling location in order to update their address.

Most of those voters were declared inactive during state voter roll maintenance, when the state was unable to reach the person by way of mailed postcards.

The state of Alabama plans to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the state's effort to ban the most commonly used second trimester abortion procedure.

Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall's office on Tuesday asked the court for additional time to file its petition for review.

In 2016, Alabama lawmakers voted to ban the abortion procedure known as dilation and evacuation. A federal judge blocked the law as an unconstitutional restriction on abortion access.

In August of this year, the 11th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals upheld the decision.

The race for Alabama’s governor has commanded much of the media attention heading into next week’s midterm elections. But there’s also a heated race for the currently-vacant position of lieutenant governor.

The two candidates seeking to fill that office say they want to use the position — which has limited official powers — to drive the political conversation in Alabama.

Republican state Rep. Will Ainsworth and Democratic minister Will Boyd are both vying for the position.

Colombia capitol
Wikimedia

Authorities in the nation of Colombia say they are reopening an investigation into whether a coal company based in Alabama financed a paramilitary group during the South American country's bloody civil conflict.

The investigation into the Drummond company is expected to focus on irregular payments allegedly made to a contractor already found guilty in relation to the murders of two labor leaders.

It’s long been accused that Drummond financed an umbrella paramilitary group, but those claims have repeatedly been dismissed in U.S. courts.

Double-nickel — the 55-mph speed limit— is still common on highways across the South.

Now, Alabama is adding a new limit: A quarter and a penny.

Al.com reports, Alabama 135 now has a 26-mph (42 kph) speed limit through Gulf State Park.  

It's on a stretch of highway in south Alabama. The speed limit there used to be 35-mph (56 kph).

The idea is that drivers will take note of the speed limit since it is an unusual one, Gulf Shores Police Chief Edward Delmore said.

Alabama Supreme Court
Chris Pruitt / Wikimedia

Six former members of the Alabama Supreme Court, including three Republicans, have signed a letter urging voters to pick Jefferson County Circuit Judge Bob Vance as the state's next chief justice.

The former justices endorsed Vance, a Democrat, over Republican Associate Justice Tom Parker in the Nov. 6 election. Parker is a current member of the court.

In the letter endorsing Vance, the justices wrote he is "clearly the most qualified candidate for this high office."

Vote Here
Danny Johnston / AP

Today is the final day to register to vote in order to participate in next month's election.

People can register online to vote until 11:59 p.m. this evening. People can also register in person at their local county board of registrars' office until the close of business, which is typically 5 p.m.

Registration forms sent through the mail must be postmarked by today.

Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill says it's crucial for Alabamians' voices to be heard this election:

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