Digital Media Center
Bryant-Denny Stadium, Gate 61
920 Paul Bryant Drive
Tuscaloosa, AL 35487-0370
(800) 654-4262

© 2024 Alabama Public Radio
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Cori Yonge

Reporter

APR Graduate student intern Cori Yonge returns to journalism after spending time in the corporate world. She is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Journalism and Media Studies from The University of Alabama and is ecstatic to be back working with public radio. Cori has an interest in health, environment, and science reporting and is the winner of both an Associated Press award and Sigma Delta Chi award for healthcare related stories. The mother of two daughters, Cori spent twelve years as a Girl Scout leader. Though her daughters are grown, she still enjoys camping with friends and family – especially if that time allows her to do some gourmet outdoor cooking. Cori and her husband Lynn live in Fairhope.

  • A Gulf Coast Environmental Group says Alabama Power’s recent announcement to recycle coal ash into cement won’t put an end to its work. The Coal Ash Action Group, featured in APR’s investigative report “Bad Chemistry,” says it will stay vigilant as long as it believes Mobile Bay is at risk.
  • Cosmetic and skin care companies have been doubling down on social media marketing directed at tweens and teens. Parents are left to figure out how to handle kids' desire for skin care products.
  • It’s been two decades since the chemical company Monsanto settled a lawsuit with Anniston residents. People there said Monsanto exposed them to chemicals called PCBs which caused birth defects and cancer. But Monsanto is far from the only alleged instance of harmful chemicals in Alabama. Here’s a tale of two communities. One that’s trying to head off problems linked to chemical pollution, and another that says it’s been dealing with the issue for years…
  • A group of seniors in Mobile, Ala., wants coal ash from a power plant moved to a lined landfill. They worry the toxic ash could leak into Mobile Bay. (Story aired on ATC on Sept. 4, 2023.)
  • A group of seniors in Mobile, Ala., wants coal ash from a power plant moved to a lined landfill. They worry the toxic ash could leak into Mobile Bay.
  • So, what did you buy during the 4th of July holiday? It might have been a vacation or stuff for the backyard barbecue. The latest U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis report confirms Americans are spending less on durable goods like cars and more on services like air travel and hotels. This, even while some grocery prices continue to be stubbornly high. So, what gives? APR goes takes us all the way back to Mardi Gras in the Mobile to explain the psychology behind spending money
  • President Biden declared June to be Immigrant Heritage Month in the U.S. The number of unaccompanied minors seeking asylum at the border with Mexico border reached a record high last year. Many of those youngsters in Baldwin County along the Alabama Gulf coast. Most could not imagine traveling to another city for fun after their harrowing time at the border. But, some newly arrived migrants at Robertsdale High School did just that. They joined local Alabama teens on a field trip to New York City.
  • As newspapers fold across the country, a citizen journalist in a small Alabama town keeps watch over the local government. (Story aired on Weekend Edition Sunday on June 11, 2023.)
  • As newspapers fold around the country, a citizen journalist in a small Alabama town keeps watch over the local government.
  • A new report paints a bleak picture when it comes to the future of news reporting in the U.S. The study from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism found the nation may lose a third of its newspapers by 2025. That trend could mean fewer journalists covering city and county governments as local news organizations cut staff over money problems. The reporter shortage means the media’s role as a watchdog is diminished. Today, we meet one man making it his mission to keep an eye on local government.