Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox

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TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — Curbside collection of recyclable materials resumes next month in one Alabama city. 

The Tuscaloosa News reports Turscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox said the city’s Environmental Services Department is on track to restore its recycling program on Nov. 2.

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Tuscaloosa is closing bars for the next two weeks after University of Alabama officials said there has been an unacceptable rise in COVID-19 cases on campus. 

COVID campus
AP Photo/Vasha Hunt

 

TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — Officials are looking for ways to improve safety during the pandemic and hopefully save college football after crowds gathered in an entertainment district near the University of Alabama over the weekend. 

Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox says he's frustrated by what happened. And Alabama athletic director Greg Byrne tweeted a photo of a crowded area that said: “Who wants college sports this fall?? Obviously not these people!!"

cw.ua.edu

 

Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox today released an executive order detailing new rules for some businesses in the wake of the city’s State of Emergency order.

These new rules, effective today at 5 p.m., include:

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Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox has enacted a 24-hour curfew within the city of Tuscaloosa starting Sunday.

Maddox made the announcement in a news conference Thursday at 8 p.m., saying that the COVID-19 situation is rapidly worsening and the only way to help reduce the numbers of people catching the virus is enacting stricter rules.

The curfew, which begins 10 p.m. Sunday and runs through April 11, will close nonessential businesses such as night clubs, gyms, spas, hair salons and retail stores not offering essential services.

curfew
WVUA 23

 

Tuscaloosa mayor Walt Maddox announced Wednesday that the city will be under a curfew beginning Friday and lasting through April 3.

 

The curfew will last from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m., and there will be exemptions for those traveling to and from work or other essential tasks.

 

“Within a one-hour drive of city hall, one-third of the state’s coronavirus cases can be found in Jefferson County,” Maddox said. “Within Lee County, which closely mirrors Tuscaloosa County, we see some of the fastest-growing rates of COVID-19 cases in our state.”

(TUSCALOOSA, AL)-- The city of Tuscaloosa is making an effort to have its experiences in the Civil Rights

   struggle share the limelight usually placed on Birmingham and Selma. Now visitors can see the places where these events happened on Tuscaloosa’s Civil Rights History Trail.

 

Lonnie Neely lead the crowd at last week's grand opening and that was just the warmup act. Work on the Civil Rights Trail Task Force that has been underway since 2016 and Wednesday was the big unveiling. Scott Bridges is the president of the task force.

Walt Maddox Announces Gubernatorial Run

Oct 5, 2017

Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox is running for governor.

Maddox made the announcement this morning morning with the release of a video on social media.

Being Blue in a Red State...

Mar 7, 2017
Allison Mollenkamp

This Tuesday Tuscaloosa is holding municipal elections and the job of Mayor is on the ballot. Voters will choose between incumbent Walt Maddox and newcomer Stepfon Lewis. In August Birmingham will make a similar choice between William Bell and Randall Woodfin. Three of the candidates share one thing in common. They’re democrats in a deeply Republican state.

These are the two names Tuscaloosa voters will see on the ballot for Mayor. Walt Maddox is the incumbent and Stepfon Lewis is the challenger. Forty minutes away, a similar race is underway.

Pre-K Expansion Celebrated in Tuscaloosa

Oct 25, 2016
ribbon cutting
Alex AuBuchon / APR

State lawmakers and education officials gathered in Tuscaloosa yesterday to celebrate the expansion of public preschool in Alabama.

The dignitaries cut the ribbon on two new preschool classrooms at Verner Elementary School in Tuscaloosa. Those are two of 155 new preschool classrooms opening this year throughout the state, serving 2800 more of Alabama’s four-year-olds than last year. That’s thanks to a $16 million increase in funding from the Alabama Legislature.

Stan Ingold

 

It has been nearly five years since a massive EF-4 tornado ripped through Tuscaloosa Alabama. Twelve percent of the city was destroyed and seven thousand people became unemployed. Here is a look at what recovery has been like for those who decided to come back and those who did not…

 

Workers in the Tuscaloosa area could see their wages go up soon.

Mayor Walt Maddox and the city council plan to consider an ordinance that would hike the local minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. The proposal prompted a march down University Boulevard to City Hall on Martin Luther King Day. The group called for economic justice and a higher minimum working wage.

Deidre Stalnaker is the Communications Director for the City of Tuscaloosa. She says she’s not entirely sure what impact the move will have on area businesses.

Stan Ingold

  

Rural Alabama residents will finally be able to get broadband internet thanks to an FCC program. It’s called Connect America and its mission is to provide access to high-speed internet everywhere in the country.

     Mark Wigfield is spokesman for the FCC. He says Windstream Communications is the latest company to come on board with Connect America.

Today is the four year anniversary of the tornado outbreak that killed more than 200 Alabamians. The damage was widespread across the state, including in Tuscaloosa.

Mayor Walter Maddox rode out the EF4 tornado at Tuscaloosa's City Hall. He says the moments after that were spent surveying the 12.5 percent of the city that was destroyed in just six minutes.

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Tuscaloosa city officials say the economic benefit of the University of Alabama's home football games far outweigh the cost the city spends on staff overtime during game weekends.

Mayor Walt Maddox said Thursday that more than 400 city employees work overtime Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays on home game weekends. Maddox says the city spends roughly $750,000 each season to cover the cost.

Maddox says each of the school's home games has a roughly $17 million to $18 million impact on the city's economy.

ci.tuscaloosa.al.us / City of Tuscaloosa

Local officials in Tuscaloosa are considering changes to local ordinances that govern rebuilding of commercial areas after the devastating tornadoes of April 2011.

The Tuscaloosa News reports Mayor Walt Maddox planned to present amendments to the city code Monday night to the Planning and Zoning Commission. One of the changes being pushed by the mayor would require businesses to hide larger trash bins from public view. Others proposals deal with design details for commercial buildings in the tornado recovery zone.

ci.tuscaloosa.al.us / City of Tuscaloosa

A housing study projects that at current growth rates, the private student housing market in Tuscaloosa will outpace University of Alabama student demand by 2015.

The Tuscaloosa News reports that results of the study were shared with a city council committee Tuesday.

Consultant Joe Zanola told the committee that the current list of student housing bedrooms that are either planned or under construction "greatly exceeds" forecasts for enrollment growth at the University of Alabama.

Butch Dill / AP

Tuscaloosa city officials say the Federal Emergency Management Agency has so far paid $5.89 million to help the city recover from the April 2011 tornado.

While officials say they wish the FEMA storm expense reimbursements, which totals $10.5 million, were being paid more quickly, Mayor Walt Maddox told the Tuscaloosa News city leaders understand federal budget cuts and the government shutdown likely had an impact on the payment timeline.

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The city council in Tuscaloosa is expected to vote Tuesday on a contract that would secure a $10 million line of credit to help fund storm recovery efforts.

The Tuscaloosa News reports (http://bit.ly/URA3B4) that if approved, it would mark the first money the city would borrow to pay for the millions of dollars in costs associated with rebuilding and cleaning up Tuscaloosa following the tornado of April 27, 2011.

cw.ua.edu

The mayors of Auburn and Tuscaloosa have something riding on the outcome of this year's Iron Bowl.

Auburn Mayor Bill Ham and Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox made a friendly wager on Saturday's game between Auburn University and the University of Alabama.

Ham will make a contribution to the city of Tuscaloosa's tornado recovery fund if the No. 2 Crimson Tide beats unranked Auburn.

Maddox will make a donation to the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Lee County if the Tigers pull off an upset and defeat Alabama.

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The city of Tuscaloosa is considering a temporary ban on some kind of businesses as it rebuilds from last year's tornado.

The City Council on Tuesday will continue a discussion of a proposed moratorium that could affect businesses including pawn shops, check-cashing stores, tattoo shops and tobacco stores.

Councilman Kip Tyner is supporting the ban. He says he wants to rebuild tornado-ravaged parts of the city with better businesses than existed before the twister in 2011.